vegetables

  • Creamy Spinach Artichoke Dip

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Makes 2 cups

    1/2 cup cashews, soaked for 20 minutes

    1 15-ounce can cannellini (white) beans, drained and rinsed

    1/2 cup water

    2 tablespoons lemon juice

    1/4 cup grapeseed Vegenaise

    3 tablespoons nutritional yeast

    1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

    1 medium yellow onion, diced

    4 garlic cloves, minced

    1 1/2 cups thawed and chopped frozen artichoke hearts (or substitute 1 1/2 cups jarred artichoke hearts)

    3 cups chopped fresh spinach (chopped small)

    1 teaspoon sea salt

    Dash red pepper flakes

    1/4 cup gluten-free bread crumbs

    Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Drain the cashews. In a food processor or blender, blend the cashews and beans with water, lemon juice, Vegenaise, and nutritional yeast until creamy. If mixture is too thick, add water one tablespoon at a time until thick and creamy. Scrape into a bowl and set aside. Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat and sauté the onion and garlic until soft. Add the artichokes and sauté until lightly browned. Add the spinach and let it wilt down, about two to three minutes. Pour into a large bowl and add the cashew and bean mixture, salt, and red pepper flakes (to taste). Stir to combine well. Pour into a lightly oiled casserole dish and top with bread crumbs. Cover with foil and bake for about 15 minutes. Remove foil and bake 10 minutes more until a little browned. Source: The Karma Chow Ultimate Cookbook by Melissa Costello

  • Quinoa Cilantro Taco Salad

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Serves 4

    2 teaspoons olive oil

    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

    1 teaspoon cumin

    1/2 teaspoon chili powder

    1/4 teaspoon sea salt

    2 tablespoons poppy seeds

    1 cup quinoa, cooked

    4 cups mixed salad greens

    5 fresh chives

    1/2 cup cabbage, shredded

    6 cherry tomatoes

    1/3 cup sunflower seeds

    1 medium onion, sliced

    1/2 cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped

    2 tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped

    1 medium carrot, cut into matchsticks

    1 cup Crunchmaster Roasted Garlic Multi-Seed Crackers, crushed

    1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

    1 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted, and sliced

    1 papaya, cut into 1/4-inch slices

    Combine olive oil, apple cider vinegar, cumin, chili powder, sea salt, poppy seeds, and quinoa in a large mixing bowl: gently toss to combine. In a large serving bowl, add mixed salad greens, and top with quinoa mixture. Add remaining ingredients: mix well. Source: crunchmaster.com

  • Colorful Winter Salad

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Serves 4

    1 small head purple cabbage, grated (about 3 cups)

    1 small head romaine lettuce, grated (about 1 cup)

    2 medium carrots, julienned (about 1 cup)

    1/4 cup tahini dressing

    In a large bowl, combine the cabbage, lettuce, and carrots. Add the tahini dressing: toss to combine, and serve. Source: Paleo Cooking from Elana’s Pantry by Elana Amsterdam photo by Leigh Beisch

     

    Tahini Dressing:

    1/2 cup roasted tahini

    1/2 cup water

    1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1 teaspoon sea salt

    In a high-powered blender, puree the tahini, water, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt until very smooth. Use right away or store in a glass jar in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Makes 2 cups.

  • Hot ‘n Sweet Broccoli and Asparagus

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Serves 4

    1/4 cup honey

    2 tablespoons soy sauce

    1 teaspoon ground ginger

    1/2 to 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper

    1 pound asparagus, trimmed

    1 pound broccoli, trimmed

    2 tablespoons olive oil or vegetable oil

    Combine honey, soy sauce, ginger, and red pepper. Cut up broccoli and slice stem. Diagonally slice asparagus. Heat oil in large skillet—add broccoli and asparagus and stir-fry over medium-high heat for three minutes. Add 1/2 cup water to pan—cover and steam vegetables for two minutes or until tender-crisp. Drain water from pan. Add honey mixture and cook uncovered until glaze is slightly thickened, about two minutes. Source: naturenates.com

  • Gardening for Healthy Living

    Many of us find information on the harmful effects of pesticides in our produce consuming our thoughts, and shoppers continue to learn about the Environmental Working Group’s “Dirty Dozen” list and their seasonal add-ons. Nothing can keep the contamination from spreading, and yet, achieving a healthy diet means eating fruits and veggies. What do we do?

    Eat and grow with ROYGBIV
    By Amy Vergin
  • Finding Your Inner Locavore

    During the summer months people emerge from their homes in search of fresh air and local organic foods—and what better way to get both than at your neighborhood farmers’ market? Not only will you reap the many rewards of walking around in the outdoors, but the market will provide local produce, fresh flowers, music, meat, and dairy products.

  • In Season: Beets

    The beet, part of the Chenopodiaceae family, shows a number of health benefits not available in other food families. Betalains are the phytonutrients that give beets their distinctive red color—they provide beet eaters with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxification support. While beets have a hard crunchy, rough-looking exterior, once cooked they become soft and buttery.

  • Health News: Juicing: Pulp Fiction?

    Though juicing is gaining ground culturally, it’s not widely recommended within the medical and surgical weight-loss community.

  • Let’s Talk Spinach

    Anyone who has grown up with the cartoon Popeye has an image seared into their brain of Popeye defending Olive Oyl’s honor, his superhuman strength fueled by a can of spinach. While the cartoon’s nutritional depiction is, well, cartoonish, spinach is still a food your body desperately needs.

    I yam what I yam …

    Popeye’s secret weapon, working for your body
    By Amy Vergin
  • What Are the Benefits of a Raw Foods Diet?

    It seems like everywhere you turn, the term “raw” appears on popular food labels.

    Unraveling the mysteries of the living foods lifestyle
    By Brian Clement, PhD, NMD, CN