vegetables

  • The New Beef

    To say that kale is one of the healthiest foods on the planet may be an understatement. Why else would it be dubbed “the new beef,” “queen of the greens,” or a “nutritional powerhouse”?

    Why kale is the best thing you’ll eat all year
    By Amy Vergin
  • Good-For-You Comfort Foods

    Comfort foods tend to be less than healthy, but with simple ingredient swaps and healthier cooking techniques, these satisfying foods can be heart-healthy, too. CanolaInfo’s “Comfort Your Heart” recipe collection (found at canolainfo.org) will show you how to do just that.

    Comfort your heart and stomach with healthy and hearty recipes
    By Dawn Jackson Blatner
  • Eating Raw is a Lifestyle

    A raw food diet is a lifestyle choice, not a weight loss plan. It centers on eating plant-based foods in their most natural state—uncooked and unprocessed.

    Rebalancing acid and alkaline

    Raw foods add balance to the Western diet
  • Getting Back To Your Roots

    As time goes by, things grow, change, and naturally evolve. This includes nutrition concepts. The more you scrutinize how what you eat affects the way your body functions, the more likely you are to make better choices regarding the food you consume. Nutrition’s evolution inevitably takes it back to nature—back to its roots.

    Sprouting for better nutrition
    By Cara Lucas
  • In Season: Sprouts

    Eating sprouts doesn’t necessarily mean eating Brussels, mung bean, or alfalfa sprouts. It can also refer to sprouting, the practice of germinating seeds to be eaten raw or cooked.

  • Juicing

    There’s a good reason why juicing’s popularity continues to grow among people who have dedicated themselves to a healthy lifestyle—simply put, juicing is the best way to collect massive amounts of nutrients into a cup.

    The best and fastest way to infuse nutrition into your body and life
    By Brian Clement, PhD, LNC
  • In Season: Cabbage

    This leafy biennial plant is grown annually and is closely related to other vegetables in the B. oleracea family, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. Cabbage—whether it’s red, green, or Savoy—is an excellent source of vitamin K and sinigrin, which shows to have cancer preventive properties.

  • Spaghetti with Roasted Vegetables

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Makes: 4 servings Time: 50 minutes

    Pesto

    1 head of garlic

    1 cup fresh basil leaves

    Juice of 1/2 lemon

    1/2 cup cooked cannellini beans (white kidney beans)

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    Some pepper

    Vegetables

    1 medium onion

    1 large red bell pepper

    12 button mushrooms

    16 cherry tomatoes

    1 tablespoon water

    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

    Salt to taste

    Pepper to taste

    6 large asparagus

    1/2 cup spinach

    Pasta

    10 ounces pasta (uncooked) of your choice

    Pesto : Cut a little off the top of a whole garlic head to expose the cloves and bake at 400 for 45 minutes or until soft. In a blender or mortar with pestle, blend the basil leaves with the roasted garlic and lemon juice first and finally add the cannellini beans and blend to a thin paste consistency. If it is too thick, add a little extra water or lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper.

    Vegetables: Peel and cut onion into eight wedges and place on a baking tray with red bell pepper, mushrooms, and tomatoes. Mix one tablespoon water with one tablespoon balsamic vinegar and use it to brush the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper, and bake at 400 until all the vegetables are cooked. Keep an eye on the baking and remove tomatoes after 10 minutes, mushrooms after 15 minutes, and finally the bell pepper and onion after about 30 minutes. Remove the blistered skin and seeds of the pepper. Cut pepper into strips. Thin asparagus can be roasted—if it is thick, it can be steamed—until tender and immediately dipped in ice cold water to retain the color.

    Pasta : Bring some water to a boil with a pinch of salt. Add pasta and once it is done (the packet should give instructions on cooking time). Set aside. In another pan, warm the vegetables. Add the pasta and fresh spinach and heat lightly. Finally, add the pesto. Season with salt and pepper if desired. Recipe courtesy of Marisa Bertocchi and photo courtesy of Mayura Mohta

  • Raw-Food Smoothies

    Are you looking for a great way to start the day with energy, something light and easy to digest? Do you need more healthful options? Are you lactose intolerant or allergic to gluten? Are you too busy to make breakfast, or need a portable breakfast to take with you?

    A wholesome way to start your day
    By Jennifer Cornbleet
  • Corn Grits with Sautéed Onion, Kale, and Cheddar

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    1 cup sliced red onion

    1 cup stemmed and slicked

    shiitake mushrooms

    1/2 teaspoon sea salt

    3 cups chopped kale

    2/3 cup corn grits

    1 teaspoon dried thyme

    2 cups boiling water

    1 1/4 cups grated cheddar cheese (about 5 ounces)

    Heat oil in a large saucepan or skillet (one with tight-fitting lid) over medium-high heat. Add onion and sauté for about five minutes, until it begins to soften. Add mushrooms and salt and sauté for about five minutes, until the mushrooms soften. Stir in kale, grits, and thyme. Lower heat, then slowly pour in water. Cover and simmer for five to ten minutes, until water is absorbed. Add cheese, cover, and let sit for about three minutes, until cheese melts. Use edge of spatula to cut the dish into wedges. Serve immediately. Recipe provided by Leslie Carr from her book Gluten-Free Recipes for the Conscious Cook (2010).