vegetables

  • Cook’s Corner: Chutney, Pizza, and Garden-Fresh Salad

    Whether you grow your own or frequent your local farmers’ market, there’s nothing quite like those first fresh vegetables of the year. (If you’re interested in growing your own, check out our “Raised-Bed Backyard Gardens” feature in this issue.)

  • Drink Your Veggies!

    Do you want to eat healthfully and supply your body with an abundance of nutrients so that you have enough energy to see you through the day? Then start incorporating green smoothies into your diet!

    Add an abundance of fruits and vegetables to your diet
    By Paul Tarbath
  • Red Cabbage

    Cabbage is rich in vitamin C and an excellent source of dietary fiber. One of the oldest vegetables, its origins trace back to Asia and the Mediterranean. Cabbage can be served cooked in soups, steamed, or pickled (producing sauerkraut). Or cabbage can be eaten raw as a salad or used as the key ingredient in coleslaw.

    Get your antioxidants, polyphenols, and vitamin C here
    By Dick Benson
  • Getting Back To Your Roots

    As time goes by, things grow, change, and naturally evolve. This includes nutrition concepts. The more you scrutinize how what you eat affects the way your body functions, the more likely you are to make better choices regarding the food you consume. Nutrition’s evolution inevitably takes it back to nature—back to its roots.

    Sprouting for better nutrition
    By Cara Lucas
  • Eating Raw is a Lifestyle

    A raw food diet is a lifestyle choice, not a weight loss plan. It centers on eating plant-based foods in their most natural state—uncooked and unprocessed.

    Rebalancing acid and alkaline

    Raw foods add balance to the Western diet
  • The New Beef

    To say that kale is one of the healthiest foods on the planet may be an understatement. Why else would it be dubbed “the new beef,” “queen of the greens,” or a “nutritional powerhouse”?

    Why kale is the best thing you’ll eat all year
    By Amy Vergin
  • Good-For-You Comfort Foods

    Comfort foods tend to be less than healthy, but with simple ingredient swaps and healthier cooking techniques, these satisfying foods can be heart-healthy, too. CanolaInfo’s “Comfort Your Heart” recipe collection (found at canolainfo.org) will show you how to do just that.

    Comfort your heart and stomach with healthy and hearty recipes
    By Dawn Jackson Blatner
  • In Season: Sprouts

    Eating sprouts doesn’t necessarily mean eating Brussels, mung bean, or alfalfa sprouts. It can also refer to sprouting, the practice of germinating seeds to be eaten raw or cooked.

  • Juicing

    There’s a good reason why juicing’s popularity continues to grow among people who have dedicated themselves to a healthy lifestyle—simply put, juicing is the best way to collect massive amounts of nutrients into a cup.

    The best and fastest way to infuse nutrition into your body and life
    By Brian Clement, PhD, LNC
  • Spaghetti with Roasted Vegetables

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Makes: 4 servings Time: 50 minutes

    Pesto

    1 head of garlic

    1 cup fresh basil leaves

    Juice of 1/2 lemon

    1/2 cup cooked cannellini beans (white kidney beans)

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    Some pepper

    Vegetables

    1 medium onion

    1 large red bell pepper

    12 button mushrooms

    16 cherry tomatoes

    1 tablespoon water

    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

    Salt to taste

    Pepper to taste

    6 large asparagus

    1/2 cup spinach

    Pasta

    10 ounces pasta (uncooked) of your choice

    Pesto : Cut a little off the top of a whole garlic head to expose the cloves and bake at 400 for 45 minutes or until soft. In a blender or mortar with pestle, blend the basil leaves with the roasted garlic and lemon juice first and finally add the cannellini beans and blend to a thin paste consistency. If it is too thick, add a little extra water or lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper.

    Vegetables: Peel and cut onion into eight wedges and place on a baking tray with red bell pepper, mushrooms, and tomatoes. Mix one tablespoon water with one tablespoon balsamic vinegar and use it to brush the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper, and bake at 400 until all the vegetables are cooked. Keep an eye on the baking and remove tomatoes after 10 minutes, mushrooms after 15 minutes, and finally the bell pepper and onion after about 30 minutes. Remove the blistered skin and seeds of the pepper. Cut pepper into strips. Thin asparagus can be roasted—if it is thick, it can be steamed—until tender and immediately dipped in ice cold water to retain the color.

    Pasta : Bring some water to a boil with a pinch of salt. Add pasta and once it is done (the packet should give instructions on cooking time). Set aside. In another pan, warm the vegetables. Add the pasta and fresh spinach and heat lightly. Finally, add the pesto. Season with salt and pepper if desired. Recipe courtesy of Marisa Bertocchi and photo courtesy of Mayura Mohta