vegetables

  • Wild Mushroom Risotto

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    Wild Mushroom Mixture

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 cup sliced shiitake mushrooms

    1 cup sliced oyster mushrooms

    1 cup sliced maitake mushrooms

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    Risotto

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1 1/2 cups Arborio rice

    1/2 cup white wine

    5 cups water or low-sodium vegetable stock

    3 tablespoons nutritional yeast

    2 teaspoons salt

    1/2 teaspoon black pepper

    In a large pot or sauté pan, heat the oil for the mushroom mixture over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, mushrooms, and thyme and sauté to soften, five to eight minutes. Season with the salt and black pepper, transfer to a bowl, and reserve. To the same pot, over medium heat, add the oil for the risotto. Add the onion, garlic, and thyme and cook until soft, about three minutes. Add the rice and toast for two minutes. Pour in the wine and cook one minute, scraping any browned bits off the bottom of the pot. Add two cups of the water or stock and turn the heat to high. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat back to medium. Allow the risotto to simmer, stirring every two minutes, until the liquid reduces by half. Add two more cups of water or stock and repeat. Add the remaining one cup of water or stock and stir frequently until most of the liquid has been absorbed by the rice but the rice is still loose. Add the wild mushroom mixture back to the pot, stir in the nutritional yeast, and season with the salt and black pepper. Serve immediately. Source: The Vegucation of Robin by Robin Quivers

  • Just Raw: Keeping it Simple

    The holidays tend to leave many people frazzled. Lots of family means lots of food, which always leads to lots of hassle. But if you choose to make a few raw appetizers, your work load will be lightened the day of, and your guests will never know the difference.

  • Cook’s Corner: Healthy Holidays

    You’ve been here before. Extended trip to the family’s for the holidays. At least two sit-down meals and a table filled with more desserts than you can feed yourself. By the time the trip is said and done, you’ve probably consumed more than several thousand calories… and none of them in the “healthy” department.

  • In Season: Celeriac

    Hailed by some as the world’s ugliest vegetable, this homely root is a perfect fall and winter non-starch alternative to potatoes. Delicious, hearty, and durable in storage, this veggie is a perennial favorite in the UK—high time for another British Invasion.

  • Health Tips: Kale (Surprise!)

    >>Ounce for ounce, kale has more vitamin C than an orange

    >>A cup of kale has 121 mg of ALA, an omega-3

    >>Kale has 133 percent of your daily vitamin A

    >>Ounce for ounce, kale has more calcium than milk

    >>Warning: It’s more likely to have pesticides than other veggies, so buy organic or grow your own

  • Behold the Beet

    For some kids, eating a beet could be considered a form of torture. Maybe if they knew just how good beets are for you—or that astronauts on Apollo 18 served them to their Russian comrades in a traditional borscht meal—they would be more willing to let beets into their lives.

    Use this venerated vegetable to benefit your well-being
    By Amy Vergin
  • In Season: Zucchini

    Though it is treated like a vegetable, zucchini is actually the fruit of the zucchini flower. Ripe in late summer, zucchinis are notoriously prolific. When shopping for them, look for smaller, younger zucchini, typically less than eight inches long. (Zucchini can grow to three feet, but they become fibrous at that size.) They should be firm and heavy with bright, glossy skins.

  • Chickpea “Tuna Salad”

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Serves 4

    2 15-ounce cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed

    1 small red onion, diced

    3 scallions, thinly sliced

    2 tablespoons capers

    1 tablespoon fresh chopped dill or 1 teaspoon dried dill

    ¼ cup chopped walnuts or sliced almonds

    3 tablespoons grapeseed Vegenaise

    1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

    2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar

    Sea salt and pepper to taste

    Using a food processor fitted with the S-blade, grind the chickpeas to small flaky pieces. Add to a bowl with the remaining ingredients and mix well using a large spoon. Season with salt and pepper. Source: The Karma Chow Ultimate Cookbook by Melissa Costello

  • Grilled Radicchio Salad

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Serves 4

    1 head radicchio

    2 heads baby bok choy, chopped

    1/2 cup minced scallions

    1 carrot, shredded

    2 tablespoons reduced-sodium tamari

    1 1/2 tablespoons agave nectar

    1/4 teaspoon mirin

    1/4 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

    Preheat grill to medium-high heat. Lightly oil the grill with canola oil. Lightly mist the radicchio with olive oil spray. If using an outdoor grill, put the intact head of radicchio on the grill and close the lid. If using a grill pan, put the head of radicchio on the pan and cover with an inverted heatproof bowl to create an oven effect. Cook until marked and softened, about six minutes. When the radicchio is cool enough to handle, quarter it to remove the core. Chop the radicchio and put it in a medium bowl. Add the bok choy, scallions, carrot, tamari, agave nectar, mirin, and oil and stir to combine. Serve warm or at room temperature. Source: Grills Gone Vegan by Tamasin Noyes

  • West African Yam and Bean Patties

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Makes 8 patties

    1 tablespoon coconut oil, extra for frying

    1 onion, diced

    1 pound yams, diced

    1 carrot, grated

    4 - 5 cloves garlic, minced

    1/2 teaspoon ginger powder

    2 teaspoons paprika

    1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

    1 can pinto beans, drained and rinsed

    1 cup cooked brown rice

    1/4 cup quinoa flakes

    1/4 cup finely chopped almonds

    Sea salt and pepper, to taste

    Lime wedges, for garnish

    Heat one tablespoon of coconut oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the diced onion, reduce the heat to medium, and cook until the onions are soft and translucent, about three to five minutes. Stir in the yams and add a pinch of sea salt. Cover and cook until the yams are completely tender, about five minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic, ginger powder, paprika, and cayenne, and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Remove from heat. Empty the pinto beans into a large bowl, and use a fork to mash them. Add the cooked vegetable mixture along with the cooked rice, quinoa flakes, and almonds. Stir to combine and then add salt and pepper, if desired. Hand-shape the mixture into eight patties. Heat a small spoonful of coconut oil in a pan over medium-low, then set a couple of patties in the hot pan. Cook the patties for about six minutes, then flip them over: you should see a nice crust on the cooked side. If they break apart during the flipping, just reshape them with the spatula—they’ll hold together once the second side is cooked. Cook for the second side for another six minutes. Repeat until all patties are cooked. Serve the patties on your bun of choice or atop a bed of greens à la “protein style” with a lime wedge on the side for garnish. Source: Thrive Foods by Brendan Brazier