vegetables

  • Sweet and Savory Root Vegetable Stew

    Weekly Recipe: 
    Weekly
    [title]
    SERVES: 6 TO 8

    1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

    6 shallots, diced

    2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger

    2 parsnips, peeled and diced

    2 medium rutabagas, peeled and diced

    2 turnips, peeled and diced

    2 sweet potatoes, peeled and diced

    1 celeriac (celery root), peeled and diced

    1 fennel bulb, halved, cored, and diced (save fronds for garnish)

    1 cinnamon stick

    Vegetable stock

    Ume plum vinegar

    In large pot over medium heat, sauté shallots and ginger in oil five minutes or until soft. Add parsnips, rutabagas, turnips, sweet potatoes, celery root, fennel, and cinnamon stick. Add enough stock to barely cover vegetables, bring to boil, cover, reduce heat, and simmer 25 minutes. Remove from heat, discard cinnamon stick, and gently purée soup three seconds using handheld blender to slightly thicken liquid and blend flavors. Season to taste with a few dashes of vinegar, garnish with fennel fronds, and serve. Source: Clean Food by Terry Walters, image by Gentl and Hyers, courtesy of Sterling Epicure

  • No Need for Meat

    A global movement known as Meatless Monday is an initiative to have people cut meat out of their diet one day a week. We decided to start providing our readers with a recipe each month to help those wanting to cut meat altogether or simply shake up their diet every once in a while.

  • Fiber First

    Most people know that the dietary choices we make play a huge role in heart health. Eating the right foods can dilate your arteries, reduce inflammation, prevent clotting, and promote circulation. What is less well known is the role of fiber in heart health.

    The unsung hero in heart health
    By Steven Masley, MD, FAHA, FAAFP, FACN, CNS
  • Food Trends for 2014

    Celebrity chefs, product developers, restaurant consultants, and even grocery store shoppers all agree that 2014 will focus on more high-impact, low-calorie options. Locally sourced meats, seafood, and produce are also a growing trend among shoppers and restaurants alike. Ancient grains like freekeh and chia are becoming buzzworthy and cropping up all over.

  • Bento Box Soup

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES: 6

    4 ounces soba noodles

    4 cups organic vegetable or chicken broth, homemade or store-bought

    1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame oil or hot pepper sesame oil

    1 (6 inch) strip of kombu

    3 green tea bags

    1 carrot, peeled and grated

    1/2 cup stemmed and sliced shiitake mushrooms

    4 ounces firm tofu, cut into 1/2 inch cubes

    2 tablespoons tamari

    1/4 cup white miso

    2 scallions, white and green parts, sliced diagonally

    1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

    1 1/2 cups loosely packed baby spinach

    Fill a soup pot halfway with water and bring to a boil over high heat. Add a pinch of salt and the soba noodles and decrease the heat to medium. Cook, stirring gently on occasion, until just tender—about five minutes. Drain and rinse well under cold water to remove the starch. Immediately transfer to a bowl, drizzle with 1/4 teaspoon of the sesame oil and toss gently to coat. Put the broth in the same pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Decrease the heat to low, add the kombu and tea bags, and simmer for four minutes. Remove the kombu and tea bags with a slotted spoon. Add the carrot, mushrooms, tofu, tamari, then cover and simmer for five minutes. Put 1/2 cup of the hot broth in a small bowl, add the miso, and stir with a fork until the miso is dissolved. Stir the mixture back into the broth, then stir in the scallions, lemon juice, and remaining sesame oil. Distribute the soba noodles and spinach among six bowls and ladle in the soup. Source: The Longevity Kitchen by Rebecca Katz with Mat Edelson, image by Leo Gong

  • Wild Mushroom Risotto

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    Wild Mushroom Mixture

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 cup sliced shiitake mushrooms

    1 cup sliced oyster mushrooms

    1 cup sliced maitake mushrooms

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    Risotto

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1 1/2 cups Arborio rice

    1/2 cup white wine

    5 cups water or low-sodium vegetable stock

    3 tablespoons nutritional yeast

    2 teaspoons salt

    1/2 teaspoon black pepper

    In a large pot or sauté pan, heat the oil for the mushroom mixture over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, mushrooms, and thyme and sauté to soften, five to eight minutes. Season with the salt and black pepper, transfer to a bowl, and reserve. To the same pot, over medium heat, add the oil for the risotto. Add the onion, garlic, and thyme and cook until soft, about three minutes. Add the rice and toast for two minutes. Pour in the wine and cook one minute, scraping any browned bits off the bottom of the pot. Add two cups of the water or stock and turn the heat to high. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat back to medium. Allow the risotto to simmer, stirring every two minutes, until the liquid reduces by half. Add two more cups of water or stock and repeat. Add the remaining one cup of water or stock and stir frequently until most of the liquid has been absorbed by the rice but the rice is still loose. Add the wild mushroom mixture back to the pot, stir in the nutritional yeast, and season with the salt and black pepper. Serve immediately. Source: The Vegucation of Robin by Robin Quivers

  • Just Raw: Keeping it Simple

    The holidays tend to leave many people frazzled. Lots of family means lots of food, which always leads to lots of hassle. But if you choose to make a few raw appetizers, your work load will be lightened the day of, and your guests will never know the difference.

  • Cook’s Corner: Healthy Holidays

    You’ve been here before. Extended trip to the family’s for the holidays. At least two sit-down meals and a table filled with more desserts than you can feed yourself. By the time the trip is said and done, you’ve probably consumed more than several thousand calories… and none of them in the “healthy” department.

  • In Season: Celeriac

    Hailed by some as the world’s ugliest vegetable, this homely root is a perfect fall and winter non-starch alternative to potatoes. Delicious, hearty, and durable in storage, this veggie is a perennial favorite in the UK—high time for another British Invasion.

  • In Season: Zucchini

    Though it is treated like a vegetable, zucchini is actually the fruit of the zucchini flower. Ripe in late summer, zucchinis are notoriously prolific. When shopping for them, look for smaller, younger zucchini, typically less than eight inches long. (Zucchini can grow to three feet, but they become fibrous at that size.) They should be firm and heavy with bright, glossy skins.