vegetables

  • Roasted Asparagus in Browned Butter

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Bring out the best flavors of this veggie with browned butter and lemon.

    1 pound asparagus, trimmed

    1 tablespoon olive oil

    2 tablespoons butter

    ½ teaspoon salt

    ¼ teaspoon black pepper

    1 teaspoon fresh organic lemon zest

    Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Toss asparagus with olive oil on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast for 10 minutes, stirring once halfway through roasting. Meanwhile, heat the butter in a small skillet over medium heat until just browned, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat. Toss asparagus with the browned butter, salt, pepper, and lemon zest. Serve immediately. Source: Fast & Simple Gluten-Free by Gretchen F. Brown, RD

    Serves 4

  • A Great Tomato Sauce

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    This sauce is the perfect way to make your comfort food justifiably healthy.

    2 tablespoons sunflower oil

    1 clove garlic, crushed

    ½ onion, chopped into small cubes

    2 ½ cups water

    12 ½ ounces vine tomatoes, chopped in half

    ¼ teaspoon balsamic vinegar

    ½ teaspoon umeboshi plum purée

    ½-inch fresh red chili (for spice, optional)

    1 ounce basil

    2 tablespoons coconut milk

    Heat sunflower oil in a pan over medium heat; add garlic and onion and cook for 2 minutes. Add ½ cup of the water to onions and garlic; let onions absorb the water then add 1 cup of water. Add tomatoes, balsamic vinegar, plum purée, and the remaining 1 cup of water. Simmer over medium to low heat for 10 minutes. Add chili, half of the basil, and coconut milk. Simmer for 5 to 7 minutes. Add a little extra water if you like a runny sauce; reduce it further if you like a drier and more intense sauce. Source: Reprinted with permission from Honestly Healthy For Life © 2014 by Natasha Corrett and Vicki Edgson, Sterling Publishing Co, Inc. Photography by Lisa Linder.

    Serves 2

  • Carrot Dogs

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Both kids and adults will want to get their hands on these unique and healthy “hotdogs.”

    2 long, straight carrots (hotdog shaped!)

    2 whole wheat hotdog buns, or 2 slices whole grain bread

    Spinach (cooked and drained, or fresh)

    Ketchup

    Mustard

    Sauerkraut

    Onions (raw, cooked, or caramelized)

    Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Boil carrots 10 to 15 minutes, or until they are hotdog-like soft. Drain and cut them in half lengthwise. Toast buns or bread if you desire. Place the carrots in the buns and top with all your fixings. Source: Reprinted by arrangement with AVERY, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company from The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook. Copyright © Ann Crile Esselstyn and Jane Esselstyn, 2014.

    Serves 2

  • Carrot, Avocado, and Turmeric Soup

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    A little spicy and a little sweet, this soup is easy to make and even better to enjoy.

    2 ½ cups fresh carrot juice

    1 Haas avocado, peeled and pitted

    ½ teaspoon ginger powder, or 1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger

    ½ tablespoon tamari

    ½ teaspoon ground turmeric

    1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice

    ¼ cup pumpkin seeds

    Blend all ingredients except the pumpkin seeds in a blender or food processor until rich and creamy. Heat a skillet over medium heat and add pumpkin seeds and a sprinkle of salt. Toast seeds until they turn just golden, then quickly transfer them to a cool plate. Serve soup as-is and top with pumpkin seeds, or heat on stove to desired temperature. Source: Choosing Raw by Gena Hamshaw. Reprinted with permission from Da Capo Lifelong, © 2014 Photo credit: Hannah Kaminsky.

    Serves 2

  • Triple Pepper-Crowned Risotto

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Eat like royalty with this dish that tastes just as good as it looks.

    2 cups short-grain brown rice

    4 cups vegetable broth

    1 onion, diced

    3 to 4 cloves garlic, minced

    8 ounces mushrooms, sliced

    3 to 4 cups kale, stems removed and leaves torn into pieces and cooked

    Red, yellow, and orange bell peppers, steamed or roasted

    In a rice cooker or on stovetop, prepare the rice as directed using the broth (not water) and add the onion, garlic, and mushrooms. Stir the warm rice for about 1 minute, until it uniformly becomes a bit creamier and stickier—you now have risotto! Arrange a bed of cooked kale on each plate and, using a small bowl or teacup as a mold, scoop about ½ cup of risotto onto the kale. Crown the risotto with peppers and serve with a salad or steamed broccoli. Source: Reprinted by arrangement with AVERY, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company from The Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease Cookbook. Copyright © Ann Crile Esselstyn and Jane Esselstyn, 2014.

    Serves 4

  • Meatless: Drink Your Breakfast

    If you want to inspire your family to make better breakfast choices, you’ve come to the right place. Although many of you admit that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, it is often skipped. Time constraints, lack of hunger, or busy schedules may be to blame for the day’s missed meal, but it’s never too late to get in the habit of eating breakfast every day.

  • Meatless: Get Juicing

    Whether you want an alternative to your morning coffee, a way to incorporate more fruits and veggies into your diet, or a full-body cleanse, juicing could be the solution you’ve been searching for.

  • How Committed is Your State to Local Foods?

    Vermont, Maine, and New Hampshire, respectively, claimed the top three spots in the 2014 Locavore Index, a ranking of each state’s—and the District of Columbia’s—commitment to promoting and providing locally grown foods.

    By Michael Fenster, MD, FACC, FSCA&I, PEMBA
  • Potlucks with Pizzazz

    Warm weather isn’t the only reason you need to throw a party this season—and neighborhood block parties, family reunions, and potlucks are all ripe with opportunities for you to showcase your inner chef. If you’re bored with the same old buffet line—cold cuts, pasta salad, and puppy chow—here are some unique, healthy ideas to bring to the table.

    Share these innovative dishes with your friends and family
    By Erica Tasto
  • Have it All When Growing Small

    You’ve heard the motto before: “Good things come in small packages.” But when it comes to backyard gardening, there’s a new phrase to remember: “Good things grow in small spaces.”

    Discover the benefits of backyard gardening
    By Heather Brautman