Thanksgiving

  • What Food Means to You

    The holiday season can be particularly difficult for diabetics, as it seems that every holiday gathering centers on food. Navigating food choices at holiday parties can also strain the willpower of even the most disciplined diabetic. The typical Thanksgiving dinner can be over 2,500 calories (with normal portion sizes) and it is easy to consume over 4,500 calories in the course of the day.

    Eat what you want—without the guilt
  • Slow Food for the Holidays

    The upcoming holidays of Thanksgiving and Christmas are about emphasizing what is best about us, about giving thanks, celebrating the spiritual, and practicing generosity. The slow food movement would like us to extend this focus to our food.

  • Overabundance

    Are you dreading it already? You know, the whole shopping/gifting/cooking/cleaning/eating/drinking/socializing/relatives/traveling season just ahead?

    Trade Stress for Gratitude This Holiday Season
    By Sara Wiseman
  • Stuffed Turkey

    Over the years, I have seen that we often eat more than intended over the holidays. It is an easy mistake to make, after all. A little sneak of cookie dough here, a bite of turkey there, a sip of egg nog—you get the picture. And that’s all before the meal starts!

    Overeating doesn’t have to be synonymous with the holidays
    By Amy Vergin
  • Talking Turkey

    The fragrant smell of roasting turkey is a welcome scent on Thanksgiving Day. But what to do with the rest of the bird when next-day turkey-and-gravy sandwiches have lost their appeal?

    Fast, fresh takes on Thanksgiving leftovers
    By Lisa Turner
  • Turkey: An American Institution

    From very early on, American folklore featured pilgrims gathered at the Plymouth settlement to celebrate their first successful harvest in America. Despite romantic interpretation and embellishment of this first Thanksgiving banquet, historical accounts are clear on one detail—it most certainly included the wild American turkey.

    You get what you pay for, but not necessarily what you bargained for.
  • Turkey: An American Institution

    From very early on, American folklore featured pilgrims gathered at the Plymouth settlement to celebrate their first successful harvest in America. Despite romantic interpretation and embellishment of this first Thanksgiving banquet, historical accounts are clear on one detail—it most certainly included the wild American turkey.

    You get what you pay for, but not necessarily what you bargained for.
  • Happy, Healthy Holidays

    Delicious holiday-inspired meals are often devoid of important nutrients and full of fat, sugar, and excess calories. The combination of holiday stress and unique, savory food often ends in a nutritional disaster and a wider waistline.

    The holiday season is the highlight of the year for many people. It's time to be around family, spend time with loved ones, take some time off work, exchange gifts, laugh, and of course, eat.
    By Brooke Holmgren
  • Party Time

    Ack, the holidays: Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, New Year’s Eve, even the Super Bowl... The months-long celebration is often met with dread. What a shift from childhood days when the Christmas countdown began in, well, June and couldn’t arrive soon enough.

    Top chefs give their best tips for how to entertain friends and family the healthy, natural way.
    By Amanda M. Faison