supplements

  • Making Sense of Multivitamins

    When we were kids, multivitamin choices seemed so simple: Do I want the yellow Pebbles or the purple Bamm-Bamm? But now that we’ve outgrown Stone Age chewables, our options have expanded. We can get our vitamins and minerals in tablets, liquids, or gummies. We can take one, two, or even five per day. We can opt for natural, food-based formulations or synthetic versions.

    By Vicky Uhland
  • No-Supp Zones

    You may want to stop storing your supplements on the shelf next to the bathtub. A new study from Purdue University found that keeping water-soluble pills and powders, such as vitamin C and B complex, in places where air is moist and warm can leave them vulnerable to deliquescence, a process in which crystalline substances dissolve due to excess humidity.

    By Sarah Toland
  • Hormone Control

    When the dark hairs began sprouting on her chin and her libido plummeted, Sherrill Sellman of Tulsa, Oklahoma, suspected changes inside her body. When she started kicking off sweat-drenched sheets every night and rocketing out of bed because of predawn anxiety attacks, she resigned herself to the inevitable: Perimenopause had set in.

    Drug-free remedies to help you ease into menopause.
    By Vicky Uhland
  • Weight Loss in a Bottle

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 68 percent of Americans are overweight and more than one-third are considered obese. Millions of people are trying to lose weight—and most wish it were as simple as popping a pill.

    Our guide to the best and worse diet supplements on the market today.
    By Gina Demillo Wagner
  • Real Relief for Migraines

    Imagine wearing a football helmet that’s too tight. Add to that upset stomach, blurred vision, and flashing lights. This is a migraine—a type of headache one memoirist described as feeling like “God just punched you in the side of the face.”

    Try these treatments when the throbbing starts.
    By Jennie Dorris
    [title]
  • The Beauty Bar: Glutathione

    By Jolene Hart Although its name may not ring a bell, glutathione could be among the most important antioxidants your body produces—and a key antiaging weapon. “Glutathione enhances the body’s ability to eliminate toxins and preserve vitamins C and E,” says David Perlmutter, MD, of the Perlmutter Health Center in Naples, Florida.

    By Jolene Hart
  • Back in Focus

    To Susan Williams of Charlotte, North Carolina, it was like a speed bump she couldn’t get past. That’s how she described the wall she would hit when work deadlines loomed and her focus pinballed from one subject to the next. “Sometimes I was so easily distracted, the simplest task seemed daunting,” says Williams, 60.

    19 ways to manage ADHD without drugs
    By Matthew Solan
  • Toxic Herbs?

    A recent study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association found heavy metals, including mercury, arsenic, and lead, in some ayurvedic herbs. The study tested two types of ayurvedic medicines—herbal only and rasa shastra. “Rasa shastra is an ancient science that uses metals and minerals in combination with herbs.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • Pill Free, Pain Free

    Athletes often joke about relying on “vitamin I,” aka ibuprofen, to get through the aches and pains of training. But they’re not the only ones who depend on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain relief.

    Swap your meds for these natural and effective alternatives.
    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Selenium: Too Much of a Good Thing?

    Selenium supplements have been touted as possible cancer fighters, but taken over a long period they might also increase your risk of type-2 diabetes by up to 50 percent, says a recent study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Scientists wanted to examine whether selenium might prevent diabetes, since previous animal studies suggested it improves glucose metabolism.

    By Matthew Solan