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  • It’s Food, Not Religion

    I know you’re exposed to a lot of diet hype.

    Give your body what it needs and wants
    By Holli Thompson, CHHC, CNHP
  • Grilled Watermelon “Caprese” Salad With Cardamom Balsamic Reduction

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    ¼ cup balsamic vinegar

    1 teaspoon organic cardamom

    Extra-virgin olive oil

    ½ (5-pound) watermelon (consider using both red and yellow watermelon for extra color)

    Fleur de sel (or any good, flake salt)

    2 cups organic baby arugula, washed and dried

    1 cup crumbled goat cheese

    Organic ground black pepper, to taste

    Preheat your grill. Real wood charcoal tastes best, but gas works fine. Aim for medium-high heat—if your grill lid has a thermometer built into the lid, it should read about 375 degrees.

    Place the vinegar and cardamom in a small saucepan and reduce, simmering on the stovetop, for roughly 20 minutes. Do not allow to burn. When it reaches the texture of warm maple syrup, remove from the heat and strain through fine mesh or cheesecloth into a heatproof bowl. Use caution: It can stick to your hands and burn you.

    Meanwhile, slice the watermelon into squares, without the rind, about 3x3 inches and ¾-inch thick. Brush them lightly with the olive oil. Grill watermelon about 2 minutes per side, or until it is marked nicely. Remove and season with the salt. Ar­range on a plate, alternating layers of watermelon, arugula, and cheese, then repeat for a three-layer “stack” on each plate. Alternatively, arrange all stacks on a serving platter. Drizzle with the balsamic reduction, sprinkle with ground black pepper to taste, and serve immediately. Optional: Substitute thin slices of fresh buffalo milk mozzarella for the goat cheese. Quick Tip: For a little more flair, cut the watermelon into shapes with a cookie cutter. Source: Simply Organic

  • Cinnamon Spice Sweet Potato Chickpea Salad

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    These sweet ‘n’ spicy potatoes make the perfect side dish to accompany any meal. Serves 4.

    2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped into 1/2 -inch pieces

    3 cups cooked chickpeas

    1 large onion, peeled and chopped

    1 teaspoon cinnamon (or more to taste)

    1 teaspoon sea salt (or more to taste)

    2 tablespoons coconut oil, divided

    Preheat oven to 425 degrees and line a large baking sheet with parchment or a nonstick liner. Peel and chop sweet potatoes. In a large bowl, add the cooked chickpeas, uncooked sweet potatoes, chopped onion, cinnamon, salt, and 1 tablespoon coconut oil. Mix well. Spread onto prepared baking sheet and place in the oven for 35 to 40 minutes. Remove from oven and place into a large bowl. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil and stir well to coat. Add additional sea salt if preferred. Source: Angela Liddon, ohsheglows.com

  • Potlucks with Pizzazz

    Warm weather isn’t the only reason you need to throw a party this season—and neighborhood block parties, family reunions, and potlucks are all ripe with opportunities for you to showcase your inner chef. If you’re bored with the same old buffet line—cold cuts, pasta salad, and puppy chow—here are some unique, healthy ideas to bring to the table.

    Share these innovative dishes with your friends and family
    By Erica Tasto
  • Carrot-Ginger Dressing

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Created by our friends at Pacific Foods, this unique recipe is an easy way to jazz up an ordinary salad. Makes 12 servings.

    1 cup Pacific Foods Organic Cashew Carrot Ginger Bisque

    4 teaspoons rice wine vinegar

    1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

    1 teaspoon tamari or soy sauce

    1 teaspoon sugar

    ½ teaspoon fresh grated ginger

    Combine all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth.

  • In Season: Arugula

    Whether you know it as garden rocket, salad rocket, roquette, or arugula, this spicy little leafy green veggie botanists call Eruca sativa has many names. Arugula resembles a small-leaved open lettuce and is in the same family as kale, mustard greens, and cauliflower.

  • Cook’s Corner: Healthy Homemade Dressings

    So you’ve decided to be the healthiest version of you possible this year. You’ve fol­lowed your exercise routines, learned to deal with the stressors in your life, and dedicated yourself to eating local and fresh. However, there is yet another factor causing inflam­mation and adding too many unwanted ingredients in your diet.

  • Raw Recipes to Remember

    Summer may be long gone, but you still need good raw sides for your table. But what do you choose? Most dressings require some sort of oil that is not considered raw. Olive oils that are raw need to be made with ripe olives, which are then stone crushed and cold pressed—many olive oils don’t meet that requirement. Reading labels is crucial when attempting to eat all raw.

  • Cook’s Corner: Chutney, Pizza, and Garden-Fresh Salad

    Whether you grow your own or frequent your local farmers’ market, there’s nothing quite like those first fresh vegetables of the year. (If you’re interested in growing your own, check out our “Raised-Bed Backyard Gardens” feature in this issue.)

  • Red Cabbage

    Cabbage is rich in vitamin C and an excellent source of dietary fiber. One of the oldest vegetables, its origins trace back to Asia and the Mediterranean. Cabbage can be served cooked in soups, steamed, or pickled (producing sauerkraut). Or cabbage can be eaten raw as a salad or used as the key ingredient in coleslaw.

    Get your antioxidants, polyphenols, and vitamin C here
    By Dick Benson
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