rosemary

  • All About: Rosemary Tea

    WHAT IT IS: Native to the Mediterranean region, rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a fragrant, perennial herb. It is often used to enhance flavors when cooking, particularly in hearty foods such as stuffing, roasted meats, and Italian dishes.

  • Grilled Black Bean Burgers and Portobello Burgers With Rosemary and Avocado

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    Serves 4

    1 can black beans, rinsed and drained
    1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
    1 cup finely chopped portobello mushroom
    1 egg, beaten
    2 large garlic cloves, minced
    3 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary leaves
    Dash cayenne pepper
    Sea salt to taste
    3/4 cup gluten-free bread crumbs or cracker crumbs, finely crumbled
    2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
    4 gluten-free buns
    1 small avocado, peeled and sliced
    8 to 12 leaves red leaf, green leaf, or butter lettuce

     



     

    1. Mash beans in a medium bowl, using a potato masher, until most of the beans are mashed, but some remain visible. Mash in onion, mushroom, and egg, mixing well. Mash in garlic, rosemary, and cayenne. Add salt and more cayenne, as needed.
    2. Add 1/2 cup bread crumbs and stir to mix well. Mixture should be sticky, but hold its shape. Add additional 1/4 cup bread crumbs, if needed.
    3. With damp hands, form bean mixture into 4 patties. Transfer each burger to a plate, and brush tops lightly with 1 tablespoon olive oil.
    4. Preheat broiler to high. Lightly brush a baking sheet with remaining olive oil, and arrange burgers on sheet. Broil for 7 to 8 minutes, turn patties over, and broil for 7 minutes on the other side. While burgers are cooking, split buns in half. Place bottom halves on a serving platter and top with avocado. Tear lettuce and arrange on bottom halves.
    5. Remove burgers from oven, place on buns, and serve immediately.

    nutrition info per serving: 565 calories; 19 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 47 mg cholesterol; 17 g protein; 10 g fiber; 164 mg sodium

  • Spice Up Your Health

    There’s good reason to season: Doctors and dietitians agree that your spice rack can be just as essential as your medicine cabinet when it comes to preventing and treating disease. Research consistently shows that many spices and herbs have medicinal qualities and can help prevent everything from cancer to the common cold.

    By Vicky Uhland
  • Healing Houseplants

    Sprucing up your home or office with a touch of Mother Nature can do more than just brighten the space. These three plants can also do wonders for your body and mind, says Shelley Torgrove, certified clinical herbalist in Denver:

    Rosemary ... for mental clarity and memory

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Roasted Oysters and Black Olives With Rosemary

    1/4 cup olive oil
    4 medium garlic cloves, finely minced
    2 tablespoons finely minced fresh rosemary leaves
    2 cups shucked oysters, drained and patted dry
    2 cups kalamta olives (drained and rinsed)
    2 sprigs fresh rosemary

    Preheat to 400 degrees.

    1. In a small bowl, combine olive oil, minced garlic, and rosemary; stir to mix well.

    2. Add oysters, and stir to coat well. Add olives and mix.

    3. Arrange oysters and olives in a shallow baking pan, and roast for five to six minutes until oysters are cooked through.

    4. Remove from oven, and season with salt and pepper.

    5. Arrange on a serving platter with fresh rosemary sprigs, and serve immediately over angel-hair pasta tossed with olive oil, garlic, and minced fresh basil.

     

    nutrition info per serving (4): 300 calories; 26 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 66 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 8 g carbohydrates; 2 g fiber; 588 mg sodium