recipes

  • Mean Green Cleaning Machine

    Between those balmy, beckoning summer nights, kids going back to school in the fall, and the blustery, hole-up-and-conserve-energy days of winter, it’s easy to neglect cleaning. Sure we’ll pick up toys and do the dishes, but I mean the down-and-dirty, scrub-until-the-floors-are-white kind of clean.

    Win the war on dirt and germs—the green way
    By Amy Vergin
  • Cook’s Corner: Chutney, Pizza, and Garden-Fresh Salad

    Whether you grow your own or frequent your local farmers’ market, there’s nothing quite like those first fresh vegetables of the year. (If you’re interested in growing your own, check out our “Raised-Bed Backyard Gardens” feature in this issue.)

  • Choose to Be Raw

    Common sense has always indicated that eating fruits and veggies is good for you—what common sense failed to mention is how valuable it is to eat those foods raw. Sometime after we discovered fire, we abandoned our “rabbit food” palate for a predominantly cooked diet.

    Learn to ditch your processed foods
  • Perfection in Pawpaw

    The sweet tropical fruit papaya—known as pawpaw in other cultures— is one of the healthiest fruits and a wonderful superfood. With its sweet and aromatic undertones and soft, butter-like consistency, there’s no question as to why Christopher Columbus dubbed it the “fruit of the angels.”

    A plant of odd proportions

    Discover the key to overall health
  • Reviving a Healthy Tradition

    Yes and no. It’s more like returning to a time-honored tradition, but in a modern way. There are manuscripts dated almost 3000 BC that tout the healthful benefits of sprouting grains. Today, makers of sprouted flours are producing the same healthful benefits, but in controlled environments that meet FDA food safety regulations.

    Is Sprouted Flour the Latest Trend in Healthy Eating?
    By Peggy Sutton
  • Red Cabbage

    Cabbage is rich in vitamin C and an excellent source of dietary fiber. One of the oldest vegetables, its origins trace back to Asia and the Mediterranean. Cabbage can be served cooked in soups, steamed, or pickled (producing sauerkraut). Or cabbage can be eaten raw as a salad or used as the key ingredient in coleslaw.

    Get your antioxidants, polyphenols, and vitamin C here
    By Dick Benson
  • In Season: Sprouts

    Eating sprouts doesn’t necessarily mean eating Brussels, mung bean, or alfalfa sprouts. It can also refer to sprouting, the practice of germinating seeds to be eaten raw or cooked.

  • Finding Comfort in Soups

    Soup’s popularity is sky high during the colder months when our bodies are craving warmth. And what could be wrong with that? It provides nutrients and health benefits for those under the weather. Unfortunately soup also often provides a high amount of calories and fat, not to mention a ridiculous amount of sodium.

  • Good-For-You Comfort Foods

    Comfort foods tend to be less than healthy, but with simple ingredient swaps and healthier cooking techniques, these satisfying foods can be heart-healthy, too. CanolaInfo’s “Comfort Your Heart” recipe collection (found at canolainfo.org) will show you how to do just that.

    Comfort your heart and stomach with healthy and hearty recipes
    By Dawn Jackson Blatner
  • Turkish Pudding

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Makes: 2 servings

    2 cups unsweetened calcium-fortified soy milk

    1 tablespoon rice flour

    1 tablespoon cornstarch

    1/4 cup sugar

    1/4 teaspoon vanilla essence

    Cinnamon powder

    In a small bowl, mix about 1/2 cup of soy milk with rice flour and cornstarch. Stir well to keep lumps from forming. Set aside. In a nonstick pan, boil the rest of the soy milk on medium heat. Add sugar and stir. Gradually stir in the soy milk, rice flour, and cornstarch mixture and add the vanilla essence. Reduce heat to low. Continue stirring until the soy milk mixture thickens. Remove from heat and let it cool. Pour into individual dessert glasses and chill in a refrigerator for about five hours. The mixture will thicken in the refrigerator. Sprinkle cinnamon powder just before serving. Recipe courtesy of Lauren Ho and photo courtesy of Joyotee