recipes

  • Choose to Be Raw

    Common sense has always indicated that eating fruits and veggies is good for you—what common sense failed to mention is how valuable it is to eat those foods raw. Sometime after we discovered fire, we abandoned our “rabbit food” palate for a predominantly cooked diet.

    Learn to ditch your processed foods
  • Red Cabbage

    Cabbage is rich in vitamin C and an excellent source of dietary fiber. One of the oldest vegetables, its origins trace back to Asia and the Mediterranean. Cabbage can be served cooked in soups, steamed, or pickled (producing sauerkraut). Or cabbage can be eaten raw as a salad or used as the key ingredient in coleslaw.

    Get your antioxidants, polyphenols, and vitamin C here
    By Dick Benson
  • Reviving a Healthy Tradition

    Yes and no. It’s more like returning to a time-honored tradition, but in a modern way. There are manuscripts dated almost 3000 BC that tout the healthful benefits of sprouting grains. Today, makers of sprouted flours are producing the same healthful benefits, but in controlled environments that meet FDA food safety regulations.

    Is Sprouted Flour the Latest Trend in Healthy Eating?
    By Peggy Sutton
  • Finding Comfort in Soups

    Soup’s popularity is sky high during the colder months when our bodies are craving warmth. And what could be wrong with that? It provides nutrients and health benefits for those under the weather. Unfortunately soup also often provides a high amount of calories and fat, not to mention a ridiculous amount of sodium.

  • In Season: Sprouts

    Eating sprouts doesn’t necessarily mean eating Brussels, mung bean, or alfalfa sprouts. It can also refer to sprouting, the practice of germinating seeds to be eaten raw or cooked.

  • Good-For-You Comfort Foods

    Comfort foods tend to be less than healthy, but with simple ingredient swaps and healthier cooking techniques, these satisfying foods can be heart-healthy, too. CanolaInfo’s “Comfort Your Heart” recipe collection (found at canolainfo.org) will show you how to do just that.

    Comfort your heart and stomach with healthy and hearty recipes
    By Dawn Jackson Blatner
  • Spaghetti with Roasted Vegetables

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Makes: 4 servings Time: 50 minutes

    Pesto

    1 head of garlic

    1 cup fresh basil leaves

    Juice of 1/2 lemon

    1/2 cup cooked cannellini beans (white kidney beans)

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    Some pepper

    Vegetables

    1 medium onion

    1 large red bell pepper

    12 button mushrooms

    16 cherry tomatoes

    1 tablespoon water

    1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar

    Salt to taste

    Pepper to taste

    6 large asparagus

    1/2 cup spinach

    Pasta

    10 ounces pasta (uncooked) of your choice

    Pesto : Cut a little off the top of a whole garlic head to expose the cloves and bake at 400 for 45 minutes or until soft. In a blender or mortar with pestle, blend the basil leaves with the roasted garlic and lemon juice first and finally add the cannellini beans and blend to a thin paste consistency. If it is too thick, add a little extra water or lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper.

    Vegetables: Peel and cut onion into eight wedges and place on a baking tray with red bell pepper, mushrooms, and tomatoes. Mix one tablespoon water with one tablespoon balsamic vinegar and use it to brush the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper, and bake at 400 until all the vegetables are cooked. Keep an eye on the baking and remove tomatoes after 10 minutes, mushrooms after 15 minutes, and finally the bell pepper and onion after about 30 minutes. Remove the blistered skin and seeds of the pepper. Cut pepper into strips. Thin asparagus can be roasted—if it is thick, it can be steamed—until tender and immediately dipped in ice cold water to retain the color.

    Pasta : Bring some water to a boil with a pinch of salt. Add pasta and once it is done (the packet should give instructions on cooking time). Set aside. In another pan, warm the vegetables. Add the pasta and fresh spinach and heat lightly. Finally, add the pesto. Season with salt and pepper if desired. Recipe courtesy of Marisa Bertocchi and photo courtesy of Mayura Mohta

  • Black Bean Burger with Kefta Spices

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Makes: 4 servings

    15 ounces cooked black beans

    1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley or cilantro

    1 small onion

    1 teaspoon ground cumin

    1 teaspoon ground paprika (sweet or smoked)

    1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

    1 clove garlic, peeled

    1 teaspoon pure olive oil

    2 eggs, white only

    1/2 cup breadcrumbs, preferably whole wheat

    Salt to taste

    Place onion and garlic in food processor. Process until fine. Add half of the black beans and oil. Process until beans are of mashed consistency. Place in a medium mixing bowl. Add remaining beans, spiced breadcrumbs, parsley, and egg white. Mix thoroughly, cover, and refrigerate for at least an hour. This allows the flavors to blend and allows moisture to be absorbed by the breadcrumbs. If too wet, add more breadcrumbs. Shape into eight small patties, packed firmly. Sauté on medium-high heat until browned on both sides. Lower heat to warm throughout. Serve with the topping of your choice. The bean patties may be frozen in a tightly sealed bag. Browning the burger before freezing will allow the beans to firm for later use on the outdoor grill. Recipe courtesy of The Kardea Gourmet by Richard Collins, MD, and Robert Leighton with Susan Buckley, RD

  • Black Olive Risotto Balls

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    2 tablespoons butter

    3 cloves garlic, minced

    2 medium shallots, chopped

    1 cup Arborio or short grain rice

    1 container (32 oz) chicken stock, warmed

    1/2 cup sauvignon blanc

    2/3 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

    1 1/3 cups freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, divided

    1/4 cup minced sun-dried tomatoes (preferably smoked)

    3 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

    1 can (2.2 oz) sliced California ripe olives, drained and coarsely chopped

    Freshly ground pepper to taste

    1 cup panko breadcrumbs

    1/2 cup flour

    2 eggs, beaten

    Olive oil cooking spray

    Melt butter in a large skillet. Add garlic and shallots: cook over medium heat for five minutes. Stir in rice and cook for two minutes more. Add chicken stock, 1/2 cup at a time, adding more when broth has been absorbed, stirring frequently. When all broth has been used, stir in mozzarella, 1/3 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano, sun-dried tomatoes, basil, olives, and pepper. Let cool, then cover and chill for at least one hour or until firm.

    Roll mixture into 1 1/2-inch balls. Stir together breadcrumbs and remaining Parmigiano-Reggiano. Roll each ball in flour, then in beaten egg, then in breadcrumb mixture. Let stand for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

    Place risotto balls on a baking sheet and spray liberally on all sides with olive oil cooking spray. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown, coating with olive oil spray every 10 minutes. Recipe and image courtesy of the California Olive Committee.

  • Moroccan Golden Potato and Vegetable Soup

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    2 tablespoons olive oil, pure

    1 onion, chopped

    5 cups water (or 3 cups water and 2 cups stock)

    1 pound (3-4) potatoes (peeled if desired, diced)

    1 carrot, diced

    1⁄2 cup turnip, diced

    1⁄2 cup cabbage, diced

    1⁄4 teaspoon turmeric, ground

    1⁄4 teaspoon black pepper, ground

    1 cup cilantro (or parsley)

    1⁄4 teaspoon harissa (a Moroccan red pepper paste)

    Heat oil in a saucepan, add onion, and cook over medium heat, stirring often, for seven minutes or until golden. Add broth, water, potatoes, carrot, and turnip and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Cover and cook over low heat for 20 minutes or until all the vegetables are tender.

    Add cabbage and turmeric and simmer for five minutes or until cabbage is tender. Season to taste with black pepper and harissa. Stir in cilantro (or parsley). Recipe courtesy of kardeanutrition.com.