recipes

  • In Season: Garlic

    Commercially available garlic is grown year-round, however the wild varieties are at their peak in March. For thousands

  • Party Time

    Ack, the holidays: Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, New Year’s Eve, even the Super Bowl... The months-long celebration is often met with dread. What a shift from childhood days when the Christmas countdown began in, well, June and couldn’t arrive soon enough.

    Top chefs give their best tips for how to entertain friends and family the healthy, natural way.
    By Amanda M. Faison
  • Healthy Chocolate Cake

    Serves 12

    Cake 
    1 2/3 cups whole-wheat pastry flour
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    3 teaspoons baking soda
    3 1/2 cups pitted dates, divided
    1 cup pineapple chunks in own juice, drained
    1 banana
    1 cup unsweetened applesauce
    1 cup shredded beets
    3/4 cup shredded carrots
    1/2 cup shredded zucchini
    3 tablespoons natural cocoa powder
    1/2 cup currants
    1 cup chopped walnuts
    1 1/2 cups water
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract

    Chocolate-nut icing
    1 cup raw macadamia nuts or raw cashews, unsalted
    1 cup vanilla soy milk
    2/3 cup pitted dates
    1/3 cup brazil nuts or hazelnuts
    2 tablespoons cocoa powder
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix flour, baking powder, and baking soda in a small bowl. Set aside.

    2. In a blender or food processor, puree 3 cups of the dates and all the pineapple, banana, and applesauce. 

    3. Slice remaining dates into ½-inch thick pieces. In a large bowl, mix sliced dates, beets, carrots, zucchini, cocoa powder, currants, walnuts, water, vanilla and flour mixture.

    4. Add the blended fruit mixture to the flour mixture, and mix well. Spread in a 9.5 x 13.5 nonstick baking pan. Bake for 1 hour or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

    5. To make the icing, combine all the icing ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth and creamy. Spread icing evenly over warm cake and serve. 

    nutrition info per serving: 300 calories; 12 g fat; 6 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 9 g protein; 44 g carbohydrates; 7 g fiber; 13 mg sodium

  • Citrus Salad With Orange Peanut Dressing

    Serves 2

    Dressing
    1/2 cup orange juice
    1/8 cup unsalted peanut butter 
    1/8 cup raw cashew butter
    2 tablespoons rice vinegar
    1 teaspoon low-sodium soy sauce
    ¼-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled
    1/4 medium clove garlic, chopped

    Salad
    15 ounces (about 10 cups) baby lettuce 
    1 avocado, sliced
    1 orange, peeled, halved, and sliced
    1/2 small sweet onion, thinly sliced 
    1 tablespoon unhulled sesame seeds 

    1. Place dressing ingredients in a blender or food processor, and blend until smooth. Refrigerate until ready to serve. 

    2. Place lettuce in a large bowl; arrange avocado, orange, and onions on top.

    3. In a pan over medium heat, toast sesame seeds for 3 minutes, tossing often to prevent burning. 4. Just before serving, lightly dress salad and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

    nutrition info per serving: 474 calories; 30 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 10 g protein; 36 g carbohydrates; 7 g fiber; 215 mg sodium

  • Foods that Fuel

    You’d never head to the yoga studio without your mat or to your spinning class without a pair of bike-friendly shorts, yet many exercisers still approach their workout without the proper fuel. Whether you’re exercising for fitness, health, or weight loss, you’ll reap greater benefits if you feed your body the right foods before and after workouts.

    What and when to eat to maxamize your workout.
    By Christie Aschwan
  • Elimination Round

    For more years than she cares to remember, La Vaughn Kemnow, 73, of Chiloquin, Oregon, was plagued by unrelenting stomach ailments—heartburn, bloating, sharp pain—along with extreme mental and physical fatigue. Whatever virus or bug happened to be floating around, Kemnow would catch.

    Identify food intolerances with this easy diet.
    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • In Season: Sunchokes

    Also called Jerusalem artichokes—although they’re not from the Holy Land and are nothing like artichokes—sunchokes resemble portly ginger covered in bumps. But what these small tubers lack in aesthetics, they make up for with a bright flavor reminiscent of jicama and water chestnuts with a whisper of apple.

    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • Three Cheers for Organic

    Your wine rack could practically earn the USDA Organic seal, but what about your liquor cabinet? Organic liquors made from ingredients grown without synthetic chemicals or pesticides abound these days. Plus, many organic brands implement ethical and environmentally friendly business practices that make buying their booze a no-brainer.

    By O'Rya Hyde-Keller
  • In Season: Acorn Squash

    Luminous golden-orange flesh, nutty flavor, and manageable size make acorn squash a perennial winter favorite. Actually a fruit thanks to its seeds, this gourd delivers magnesium, vitamins C and B6, and blood pressure–lowering potassium with few calories. And you can’t beat acorn’s levels of beta-carotene, an antioxidant the body converts to immunity-boosting vitamin A.

    By Matthew Kadey, RD
  • Sleep Saboteurs

    If you’re among the estimated 65 percent of Americans who have trouble sleeping at least a few nights a week, you’re probably tired of hearing about all the possible culprits for your bedtime woes, from too much caffeine and late-night TV to not enough exercise or unwind time in the evenings.

    What to eat and what to avoid to put insomnia to rest.
    By Monica Bhide