omega-3

  • Essential Fatty Acids and Breast Health

    The fish oil pill that you pop once a day for benefits like brain and heart health may have further reaching effects than you thought. Scientists and doctors alike are accumulating a nice body of evidence that shows fish oil to have proven mechanistic actions that can influence cancer—breast cancer specifically.

    How fish oil and omega-3 supplements impact breast cancer
    By Cara Lucas
  • Health Tips: Eating Fish, Chicken, and Nuts May Lower Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    A new study published in the online issue of Neurology suggests that eating foods that contain omega-3 fatty acids, such as fish, chicken, salad dressing, and nuts, may be associated with lower blood levels of a protein related to Alzheimer’s disease and memory problems.

  • Health News: Adding Fish Oil to Yogurt May Help People Meet Nutrition Requirements

    A study published in the Journal of Dairy Science shows that it may be possible to achieve the suggested daily intake of omega-3 fatty acids by incorporating them into a serving of savory-flavored yogurt.

  • Indian Spiced Salmon

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Salmon contains an abundant supply of omega-3 fatty acids, which keep the heart healthy and reduce inflammation. Several studies suggest that curcumin, a component of the spice turmeric, may also put a damper on inflammation, as well as protect against chronic diseases. One study in mice showed that curcumin may also protect against breast cancer.

    Ingredients:

    1 teaspoon turmeric

    1 teaspoon curry powder

    1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

    1/4 teaspoon allspice

    1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

    1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon salt

    4 (6-ounce) wild salmon fillets or steaks, about 1-inch thick

    2 teaspoons olive oil

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    1. Place the first five ingredients in a small bowl; whisk to blend.

    2. Sprinkle salt evenly onto both sides of the fish. Pat spice mixture onto one side of each fillet.

    3. Heat oil in a large, ovenproof, nonstick skillet over medium-high heat.

    4. Add salmon, spiced side down, and cook for two to three minutes or until nicely browned.

    5. Place salmon in oven, and bake it for five to six minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

    Serves 4

    Nutrition information per serving: Calories 266; Protein 34 g; Carbohydrate 1 g; Total fat 13.2 g; Saturated fat 2 g; Cholesterol 94 mg; Sodium 223 mg; Fiber 0.3 g

  • Broccoli-Walnut Pesto with Lime

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Broccoli packs a powerful nutritional punch, with plenty of vitamin C and folate, and the walnuts contribute beneficial omega-3s. I like the added depth of flavor the anchovies provide—they don’t taste fishy in this recipe and they do contribute more healthy fats—but omit them if you wish.

    Ingredients:

    3 cups fresh broccoli, separated into florets, stems chopped

    2 anchovy fillets, canned or jarred (optional)

    1/3 cup walnuts

    2/3 cup water, vegetable or low-salt chicken stock (more if necessary for consistency)

    1/2 cup fresh basil leaves, or substitute parsley

    2 cloves garlic

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice (or lemon juice)

    1/2 teaspoon salt (less if you use anchovies)

    Fresh ground pepper to taste

     

    1. Steam broccoli over water or stock in a covered saucepan, about 5 minutes. Do not overcook—it should be bright green.

    2. Remove broccoli from pot with a slotted spoon, and put into a blender or food processor.

    3. Add remaining ingredients to the blender container and process until smooth. For a thinner consistency, add more water or stock, a tablespoon at a time. Adjust seasoning, adding salt, pepper, or more lime juice to taste.

    4. Serve warm over cooked whole-wheat pasta sprinkled with crushed, roasted walnuts, if desired. Or use as a spread on sandwiches or as a dip for fresh vegetables.

    4 servings as a topping for pasta

  • Rainforest Superfood: Chia Seeds

    Chances are you’ve heard the phrase “good things come in small packages”—and in the instance of chia seeds, this is certainly true. Like most superfoods, chia grows south of the equator in the fertile Central and South American regions.

    Ancient nutrition for modern times
    by Brooke Holmgren
  • Turning the Tides

    Buying seafood these days is no easy feat. With wild fish stocks disappearing fast and concerns about the safety of farmed fish rising (not to mention the negative impact it’s having on the ocean environment) health-conscious consumers want to know which is better: wild or farmed?

    The smartest seafood choices for your health—and the Earth.
    By Alison Anton