nutrition

  • Slow Food for the Holidays

    The upcoming holidays of Thanksgiving and Christmas are about emphasizing what is best about us, about giving thanks, celebrating the spiritual, and practicing generosity. The slow food movement would like us to extend this focus to our food.

  • Men’s Health: Staying Young, Strong, and Pain-Free!

    Do you remember when you could shoot hoops until the wee hours or play a round of 18 holes without feeling the effects the next morning? When I could no longer do that it was a rude awakening for me, and a reminder of the importance of taking care of myself and making the most of each day.

    By Robert DeMaria, DC, NHD
  • 6 Tips for Glowing Skin

    Due to the myriad of photos now being posted online, more people than ever are undergoing cosmetic procedures. Requests for surgery as a result of social media photo sharing rose 31 percent in 2012 according to a report by the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Do you look your best on social media?
    By Rick Noodleman, MD, and Arlene Noodleman, MD
  • In Season: Sweet Potatoes

    Sweet potatoes have long been a very tasty November staple … but did you know they are a superfood? One of nature’s best sources of beta-carotene, a single cup provides 438 percent of our daily vitamin A needs with a modest 102 calories. To get the full benefit of the beta-carotene, it’s important to have a little fat at the same time … butter anyone?

  • What Food Means to You

    The holiday season can be particularly difficult for diabetics, as it seems that every holiday gathering centers on food. Navigating food choices at holiday parties can also strain the willpower of even the most disciplined diabetic. The typical Thanksgiving dinner can be over 2,500 calories (with normal portion sizes) and it is easy to consume over 4,500 calories in the course of the day.

    Eat what you want—without the guilt
  • Cook’s Corner: Healthy Holidays

    You’ve been here before. Extended trip to the family’s for the holidays. At least two sit-down meals and a table filled with more desserts than you can feed yourself. By the time the trip is said and done, you’ve probably consumed more than several thousand calories… and none of them in the “healthy” department.

  • Health Tips: Potato (The Next Generation)

    If you want to show yourself a nutritionally enlightened trendsetter this year, consider either replacing or supplementing the mashed potatoes with mashed sweet potatoes.

  • Health Tips: Sleepless Nights Tied to Junk Food Cravings

    Sleepless nights impair the brain’s frontal lobe, which controls complex decision making. They increase activity, however, in the brain centers that respond to rewards, according to a recent study from UC Berkeley. Corresponding to this, the study authors also noticed that subjects strongly favored unhealthy snack and junk foods when running on low sleep.

  • Wild Mushroom Risotto

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    Wild Mushroom Mixture

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 cup sliced shiitake mushrooms

    1 cup sliced oyster mushrooms

    1 cup sliced maitake mushrooms

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    Risotto

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1 1/2 cups Arborio rice

    1/2 cup white wine

    5 cups water or low-sodium vegetable stock

    3 tablespoons nutritional yeast

    2 teaspoons salt

    1/2 teaspoon black pepper

    In a large pot or sauté pan, heat the oil for the mushroom mixture over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, mushrooms, and thyme and sauté to soften, five to eight minutes. Season with the salt and black pepper, transfer to a bowl, and reserve. To the same pot, over medium heat, add the oil for the risotto. Add the onion, garlic, and thyme and cook until soft, about three minutes. Add the rice and toast for two minutes. Pour in the wine and cook one minute, scraping any browned bits off the bottom of the pot. Add two cups of the water or stock and turn the heat to high. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat back to medium. Allow the risotto to simmer, stirring every two minutes, until the liquid reduces by half. Add two more cups of water or stock and repeat. Add the remaining one cup of water or stock and stir frequently until most of the liquid has been absorbed by the rice but the rice is still loose. Add the wild mushroom mixture back to the pot, stir in the nutritional yeast, and season with the salt and black pepper. Serve immediately. Source: The Vegucation of Robin by Robin Quivers

  • Stuffed Artichoke

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    2 artichokes

    4 ounces crab meat

    2 tablespoons crème fraiche

    1 tablespoon lemon zest

    1 tablespoon chopped chives

    1 teaspoon olive oil

    Salt to taste

    Frisée to garnish (curly chicory or endive)

    Cover the artichokes with water in a large pot and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 25 to 45 minutes or until the outer leaves of the artichoke can easily be pulled off. Set aside to cool. Once cooled, cut the artichokes in half and remove the inner choke (or heart) and bristles with a spoon. In a bowl, combine the crab meat, crème fraiche, lemon zest, chives, and oil. Mix well and season to taste. Stuff each artichoke half with two tablespoons of the crab meat mixture. Plate and garnish with frisée. Source: Peruvian Power Foods by Manuel Villacorta, MS, RD