• Keep Your Peepers!

    According to the World Health Organization, 285 million people worldwide are considered to be visually impaired. 65 percent are 50 years old or older. Here are some ways to prevent and ease the loss of sight:

    >> Eat veggies rich in beta-carotene and vitamin A, such as squash and carrots.

  • Are You Taking the Right Supplements?

    By far the most common questions I am asked have to do with what nutritional supplements to take and, equally important, what not to take. After all, there are a staggering number of choices out there—anyone who has walked into the supplement section of a natural foods store or conducted a quick online search on a vitamin supersite can attest to that.

    Discover what you need and what you don’t
    By Michael A. Smith, MD
  • Cook’s Corner: Healthy Homemade Dressings

    So you’ve decided to be the healthiest version of you possible this year. You’ve fol­lowed your exercise routines, learned to deal with the stressors in your life, and dedicated yourself to eating local and fresh. However, there is yet another factor causing inflam­mation and adding too many unwanted ingredients in your diet.

  • Feeding the Nations

    Moringa, a tree native to the foothills of the Himalayas, has been around for thousands of years—yet we are just starting to realize the power it contains. Could this tree be the key to ending poverty and nourishing the malnourished?


    Can moringa end poverty and hunger?
    By Amy Vergin
  • Muesli

    Weekly Recipe: 

    1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats

    2 tablespoons raisins, unsoaked

    1 tablespoon chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons sunflower or pumpkin seeds, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons maple syrup, whole cane sugar, or coconut sugar (optional)

    1/2 cup Strawberry Cashew Yogurt

    1/4 cup fresh blueberries or sliced strawberries

    Put the oats, raisins, almonds, sunflower seeds, and optional maple syrup in a small bowl. Toss gently to combine. Serve with Strawberry Cashew Yogurt and berries. For soft muesli, soak in 1/4 cup of water for 8 to 12 hours at room temperature. Source: Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People by Jennifer Cornbleet, images courtesy of Warren Jefferson

  • Primal Eating (In a Nutshell)

    Primal eating is booming. The rationale behind it is simple: Our genome hasn’t changed much over the past 10,000 years, but our diet now is very different from what we’re adapted to, leading to a glut of chronic disease. Here’s a quick guide to primal foods:

    Primal supplements

  • Local Rules

    There was a lot to like in the food projections at the beginning of this year. After perusing many different sources some distinct commonalities emerged—simple, healthy, farm-to-fork, hyper-local sourcing, and sustainability all rang out resoundingly across the food forecasts.

    Functional foods vs. superfoods

    This year in superfoods
    By Adam Swenson
  • Your Future Family

    Women can have it all—depending on how you define it. Love? Sure. Career? No problem. Children? Well, you’ll have to plan accordingly. This last checked box is where it gets a little more complicated.

    It’s possible to have it all…if you plan for it!
    By Cara Lucas
  • When Two is Enough

    “Somewhere between 250,000 and 500,000 children go blind annually as a result of vitamin A deficiency,” says Kim Saam, marketing and communications manager for Vitamin Angels. “But with two simple doses of vitamin A supplementation a year, that number can be reduced by 68 percent.”

    Vitamin Angels seeks to raise awareness of nutritional deficiencies for children and mothers in their 20th year.
    By Amy Vergin
  • Focus On: Prenatal Vitamins

    WHAT IT IS: Prenatal vitamins are intended to make up for any nutritional deficiencies that may be present in women who are either pregnant or trying to conceive. These should not be thought of as a substitute for a good diet, but rather a supplement to a well-rounded diet.