nutrition

  • Muesli

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 1 SERVING

    1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats

    2 tablespoons raisins, unsoaked

    1 tablespoon chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons sunflower or pumpkin seeds, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons maple syrup, whole cane sugar, or coconut sugar (optional)

    1/2 cup Strawberry Cashew Yogurt

    1/4 cup fresh blueberries or sliced strawberries

    Put the oats, raisins, almonds, sunflower seeds, and optional maple syrup in a small bowl. Toss gently to combine. Serve with Strawberry Cashew Yogurt and berries. For soft muesli, soak in 1/4 cup of water for 8 to 12 hours at room temperature. Source: Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People by Jennifer Cornbleet, images courtesy of Warren Jefferson

  • Primal Eating (In a Nutshell)

    Primal eating is booming. The rationale behind it is simple: Our genome hasn’t changed much over the past 10,000 years, but our diet now is very different from what we’re adapted to, leading to a glut of chronic disease. Here’s a quick guide to primal foods:

    Primal supplements

  • Let Food Be Thy Medicine

    How many prescription medications did you take this morning? Do you know what they do? What ingre­dients are found within the core of that little capsule? Today we can simply take a pill to remedy any ache and keep your body running smoothly … or so they say. In fact, the path to health doesn’t run through a pharmacy—it can be found right on your dinner plate.

    Finding health on your dinner plate
    By Amy Vergin
  • Planning a Detox?

    American culture prizes speed. After all, we championed fast food, instant coffee, and microwave cooking. But as you’ve probably noticed in these examples, the fast way is not necessarily the best way—and this is particularly true when detoxifying the body.

    Why you need to take it slow
    By Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc
  • Maple Nut Granola

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 12 CUPS

    4 cups rolled oats

    2 cups crispy brown rice cereal

    1 1/2 cups unsweetened coconut flakes

    1 cup sliced almonds

    1 cup chopped walnuts

    2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

    1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

    1/2 cup virgin coconut oil, melted

    1/2 cup maple syrup

    1 teaspoon almond extract

    Preheat oven to 250 degrees. In large bowl, mix together all dry ingredients. In separate bowl, whisk together oil, syrup, and al­mond extract. Pour wet mixture over dry and stir to coat. Trans­fer mixture to two 9x12-inch glass casserole pans and spread out evenly. Bake 60 minutes or until golden. Turn off oven, but do not remove granola until completely cooled and set. Remove from oven and use spatula to release granola and break into chunks. Store in airtight container. Source: Clean Food by Terry Walters, image by Gentl and Hyers, courtesy of Sterling Epicure

  • Food Term: Functional Foods

    Foods that have a health effect beyond basic nutrition. (Or, as the New York Times calls them, “foods with benefits.”) Tomatoes are a great example: Besides being delicious and giving your body some calories to burn, they are loaded with lycopene, a potent antioxidant.

  • When Two is Enough

    “Somewhere between 250,000 and 500,000 children go blind annually as a result of vitamin A deficiency,” says Kim Saam, marketing and communications manager for Vitamin Angels. “But with two simple doses of vitamin A supplementation a year, that number can be reduced by 68 percent.”

    Vitamin Angels seeks to raise awareness of nutritional deficiencies for children and mothers in their 20th year.
    By Amy Vergin
  • Your Future Family

    Women can have it all—depending on how you define it. Love? Sure. Career? No problem. Children? Well, you’ll have to plan accordingly. This last checked box is where it gets a little more complicated.

    It’s possible to have it all…if you plan for it!
    By Cara Lucas
  • Local Rules

    There was a lot to like in the food projections at the beginning of this year. After perusing many different sources some distinct commonalities emerged—simple, healthy, farm-to-fork, hyper-local sourcing, and sustainability all rang out resoundingly across the food forecasts.

    Functional foods vs. superfoods

    This year in superfoods
    By Adam Swenson
  • Focus On: Prenatal Vitamins

    WHAT IT IS: Prenatal vitamins are intended to make up for any nutritional deficiencies that may be present in women who are either pregnant or trying to conceive. These should not be thought of as a substitute for a good diet, but rather a supplement to a well-rounded diet.