nutrition

  • Get Growing!

    My fascination with growing food started in the third grade, when the entire class grew tiny tomato plants on the windowsill of our classroom. The plants died before sprouting any fruit, but my interest in gardening took root. Since then, I’ve had many more successes in the garden: strawberries, melons, fresh salad greens, and yes, even tomatoes.

    Big or small, a garden can hlp you cultivate a healthy body and calm mind.
    By Jodi Helmer
  • Sleep Saboteurs

    If you’re among the estimated 65 percent of Americans who have trouble sleeping at least a few nights a week, you’re probably tired of hearing about all the possible culprits for your bedtime woes, from too much caffeine and late-night TV to not enough exercise or unwind time in the evenings.

    What to eat and what to avoid to put insomnia to rest.
    By Monica Bhide
  • The Benefits of a Big Lunch

    Editor's picture

    A while back my ayurvedic doc, John Douillard, DC, PhD, told me that I—and everyone else for that matter—needed to eat my biggest meal between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. when your digestive fires are burning strongest.

  • Veg Out

    Ask a roomful of vegetarians why they decided to make the meat-free leap, and you’ll likely get a roomful of answers. Some might love animals. Some might have ecological reasons. Some might have eschewed their steak-eating days to lose weight.

    Becoming a vegetarian can do wonders for your health—if you do it right
    By Bryce Edmonds
  • The 2009 Get Healthy & Stay Healthy Guide

    We’ve all heard the same advice a million times, no matter what our health concerns: Eat better, exercise more, and stress less. But why is that so hard for many of us to do?

    While most nutritionists and doctors tell us to eat plenty of fruits, veggies, whole grains, and spices—they don’t really explain how we can do that in three meals a day.

    By Lindsay Wilson, Nicole Duncan, Erin Quinn, Kate Hanley
  • Build A Better Breakfast

    A well-balanced morning meal may be the key to maintaining a healthy weight, but a recent study shows that eating a variety of foods for breakfast—for example, toast with a glass of milk and a banana, rather than just toast—also improves mental functioning and alertness.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Get Your Kids to Eat Healthier

    Beware the power of suggestion, and turn off the Saturday morning cartoons. According to researchers at the Center for Science in the Public Interest and the University of Minnesota, nine out of 10 food commercials shown during Saturday morning children’s TV shows feature foods that have poor nutritional quality.

  • New Hope for Parkinson's

    At first, Sally Sweeney’s hands trembled just enough to make holding the morning newspaper tough. Then, on long walks, her right arm would stop its natural swinging. Her always-precise handwriting suddenly looked a little off. The active, 52-year-old mother of four figured she had a pinched nerve or something.

    This disease strikes people at younger ages than ever before, but powerful treatments are on the horizon.
    By Jennie Lay
  • Get Them Hooked on Veggies Young

    If children are going to learn to love vegetables and other good-for-you foods, it’s important to expose them to healthy fare early on. How early? Starting in utero and continuing through breast-feeding, says new research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Slim Down Before Summer

    Diet downfall #1
    You don’t really have a plan. “We’re constantly bombarded with new, trendy diets—but most of us get confused by all the mixed messages and don’t really follow just one plan,” says Rubin.

    Jordan Rubin, author of Perfect Weight America (Siloam, 2008), shares three reasons diets often fail—and simple fixes that can help you stay on track.
    By Meghan Rabbitt