nutrition

  • Smart and Delicious Eating for a Healthy Heart: Comparing Traditional Diets

    The Mediterranean Diet // With as much as 40 percent of daily caloric intake coming from fat, the Mediterranean diet challenged the widely held belief that low-fat eating would best advance heart health. The fats are unprocessed and unsaturated, vegetables and fruits are central to these eating traditions. Fish, shellfish, red meat, dairy, and poultry are used in moderation.

    By Rob Leighton and Dr. Richard Collins
  • Foods to Boost Your Mood

    Boost Your Mood

    Fight the blues wit these nutrient-packed superfoods.
    By Marjolein Brugman
  • What to Eat for Better Heart Health

    Eat This:
    >Wild-caught salmon and other cold-water fish
    >Lean cuts of lamb or skinless poultry
    >Free-range poultry, eggs
    >Oatmeal
    >Spinach, romaine lettuce
    >Fresh, organic foods
    >Raw, organic butter
    >Blueberries
    >Beans, brown rice, quinoa
    >Organic
    >Olive or coconut oil

    By Larry Trivieri, JR
  • Comfort Foods

    Michael Smolensky, Ph.D., is acknowledged as one of the leading authorities in chronobiology, the science of how the body’s rhythms change throughout the course of the day, month, year, and lifetime.

    Make healthier choices when you just want to hunker-down.
    By Ellen Swandiak
  • D's Dietary Sources

    Vitamin D is naturally found in only a few foods. Because it is produced by our bodies, through our skin, animal products are primary sources of vitamin D3 such as eggs, fish, and meat.

    By Craig Gustafson
  • Immunity Superstars: The 10 Best Foods to Fight Off Colds and Flu

     

    You've loaded up on tissues for the winter. But a smartly stocked pantry and refrigerator can prevent those sniffles in the first place.
    by Kate Hanley
  • Eat for Optimal Health

    One night in May 2008, Emily Boller had an epiphany: Her body was a work of art, and it was high time she crafted it into a masterpiece. The avid painter was used to spending hours on her expressionist landscapes and flowers but little time on her diet and health. A 49-year-old mother of five, Boller says many of her meals were variations on pizza or pasta.

    A micronutrient-rich diet can shrink your waistline and increase wellness. Here’s how.
    By Joel Warner
  • Pink Grapefruit and Fig Tart

    Shell
    1/2 cup chopped pecans
    1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
    1 tablespoon butter
    1/4 cup fresh dates
    2 egg whites
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    Filling
    2 grapefruit, peeled and pith removed
    1 whole cinnamon stick or 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    2 tablespoons honey
    2 tablespoons sugar
    2 cups fresh or dried mission figs, halved (about 10 fresh figs)
    2 cups Greek–style yogurt

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix pecans, flour, butter, and dates into a fine meal in a food processor. Blend in egg whites and salt.

    2. Coat the inside of a tart pan with natural cooking spray. Line the bottom with parchment paper cut to fit, and coat again. Place dough in pan, and flatten evenly with your fingers to form a thin layer. Score dough by poking it with a fork. Place a piece of parchment paper over the dough and cover with pastry weights (use dried beans if you don’t own weights).

    3. Bake tart dough until the sides begin to brown, about 15 minutes. Remove parchment paper and continue baking until the bottom has completely cooked, an additional 15 to 20 minutes.

    4. Segment grapefruit, holding fruit over a bowl to reserve approximately 1/4 to 1/2 cup juice. Grate the peel of 1 grapefruit, and place grated peel, cinnamon, honey, sugar, and reserved juice in a saucepan. Simmer on low heat until mixture begins to thicken, about 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.

    5. Remove cinnamon stick from mixture, and stir in figs and grapefruit segments. Place 1 cup yogurt in the bottom of the tart shell, then top with fruit mixture. To serve, cut into 8 portions and garnish with a dollop of remaining yogurt.

    nutrition info per serving: 240 calories; 8 g fat; 8 mg cholesterol; 8 g protein; 39 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 110 mg sodium

  • Foods that Fuel

    You’d never head to the yoga studio without your mat or to your spinning class without a pair of bike-friendly shorts, yet many exercisers still approach their workout without the proper fuel. Whether you’re exercising for fitness, health, or weight loss, you’ll reap greater benefits if you feed your body the right foods before and after workouts.

    What and when to eat to maxamize your workout.
    By Christie Aschwan
  • Crab Salad With Avocado, Apple, and Green Beans

    1 1/2 cups green beans, trimmed at both ends, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
    2 tablespoons coarse sea salt
    1 cup Greek–style yogurt
    1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
    1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
    4 tablespoons minced fresh chives
    1 Granny Smith apple, peeled and cubed
    1 ripe avocado, peeled and cubed
    8 ounces cooked lump crabmeat (about 1 cup)

    1. Fill a large pot fitted with a colander with water. Bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Add green beans and coarse sea salt to colander, and cook until tender, 3 to 4 minutes.

    2. Remove colander from pot. Rinse beans with cold water, drain, and pat dry with a clean towel.

    3. Whisk yogurt, mustard, and fine sea salt in a large, shallow bowl. Add green beans, chives, apple, avocado, and crabmeat. Toss and serve.

    nutrition info per serving: 220 calories; 9 g fat; 38 mg cholesterol; 20 g protein; 17 g carbohydrates; 5 g fiber; 610 mg sodium