mercury

  • Minding Your Mercury

    For those living in urban areas, and even many who don’t, environmental pollution is a persistent fact of life. We see it in the brown haze on the horizon, the black soot covering plowed snow, the multicolor sheen on waterways. But this is just some of the visible evidence—pollution lives a secret life as well.

    Solutions to mercury toxicity
    By Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc
  • 5 Tips for Eating Seafood Safely

    If you read health and diet magazines, you’ve probably learned that eating seafood is good for you. But is it possible to have too much of a good thing? Kelli M.

  • Mercury on the Rise

    Confession: I’m a nutritional Girl Scout, the kind of shopper who stands in the aisle squinting at food labels. When I was pregnant, I knew I was supposed to limit my intake of certain kinds of fish—no shark, swordfish, mackerel, or tuna—because they contain higher levels of mercury, which can harm developing fetuses.

    Protect yourself from this dangerous environmental poison.
    By Cara McDonald
  • Toxic Herbs?

    A recent study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association found heavy metals, including mercury, arsenic, and lead, in some ayurvedic herbs. The study tested two types of ayurvedic medicines—herbal only and rasa shastra. “Rasa shastra is an ancient science that uses metals and minerals in combination with herbs.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • ASk The Doctor: Mercury Exposure

    You bring up an excellent question, and I hear it at my clinic almost weekly. Your experience at the doctor’s office mirrors the typical approach to heavy-metal testing—if the physician tests you at all.

    My family doctor tested my blood for heavy-metal poisoning and told me he saw no sign of lead or mercury. I’ve since heard that the test he used may not be very accurate. Should I get retested?
    By Paul S. Anderson, ND
  • Ask The Doctor: Mercury Exposure

    You bring up an excellent question, and I hear it at my clinic almost weekly. Your experience at the doctor’s office mirrors the typical approach to heavy-metal testing—if the physician tests you at all.

    My family doctor tested my blood for heavy-metal poisoning and told me he saw no sign of lead or mercury. I’ve since heard that the test he used may not be very accurate. Should I get retested?
    By Paul S. Anderson, ND