inflammation

  • Inflammation

    Inflammation is a condition that, to one degree or another, afflicts tens of millions of people nationwide. As an isolated occurrence, inflammation is an appropriate response your body employs to address injury or infection. When inflammation becomes persistant, however, that’s a cause for concern.

    Put out the fire that consumes your health.
    by Sayan Sarkar
  • In The Clear

    Once puberty had come and gone, I thought my pimples had followed my prom dress into the back closet. But the joke was on me. At 31, days after giving birth, my face began breaking out in a freak show that could rival any teenager’s.

    Get rid of adult acne once and for all.
    By Trisha Gura
  • Eat to Beat Inflammation

    Inflammation has become quite the buzzword lately, touted as the cause of everything from acne to Alzheimer’s and from digestive issues to obesity. And while new research continues to support that theory, it’s important to remember that inflammation can actually be a good thing.

    7 foods that can transform your health
    By Alison Anton
  • Moroccan Chicken With Olives

    1 yellow onion, diced
    3/4 cup chopped parsley plus a little more for garnish
    1/2 teaspoon turmeric
    1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
    1/2 teaspoon mild paprika
    1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
    1/8 teaspoon cayenne
    1/2 to 1 teaspoon salt (check sodium content of stock)
    1 teaspoon agave nectar or sugar
    2 tablespoons olive oil, plus another tablespoon for drizzling
    6 to 8 chicken thighs, bone in, with skins
    1 cup chicken stock or water
    1 teaspoon lemon zest (grated peel)
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 cup Gaeta or Kalamata olives, pits in

    1. Mix the onion, parsley, spices, salt, and agave nectar in a medium bowl.

    2. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add chicken in a single layer, and cook 2 to 3 minutes on each side until slightly browned.

    3. Add the stock and onion mixture. Bring the stock to a boil, reduce heat to low, cover, and cook gently for 20 minutes until the chicken is tender and no pink flesh remains.

    4. Place the chicken on a platter. Turn the heat up to medium-high, and let the sauce simmer for 2 to 3 minutes until reduced slightly. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the lemon zest, lemon juice, and olives.

    5. Spoon the sauce over the chicken. Drizzle with olive oil, and garnish with the remaining parsley.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 297 calories; 22 g fat; 5 g saturated fat; 72 mg cholesterol; 18 g protein; 8 g carbohydrates; 2 g fiber; 459 mg sodium

  • Olive Tapenade

    1 cup pitted Kalamata olives
    1 canned sardine fillet
    2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
    1/2 tablespoon capers
    2 cloves garlic
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 teaspoon sugar (optional)

    Blend all ingredients in a food processor or blender until pureed.

    Nutrition info per serving (4 to 6): 160.4 calories; 15 g fat; 0.7 g saturated fat; 2.8 mg cholesterol; 0.6 g protein; 6.1 g carbohydrates; 0.1 g fiber; 712.9 mg sodium

  • Pineapple-Date Ambrosia

    1 cup Greek or regular plain, unsweetened yogurt
    4 to 6 tablespoons agave nectar (depending upon desired sweetness)
    4 cups diced fresh, ripe pineapple
    1 heaping cup chopped dates
    1 cup coconut flakes
    1/2 cup minced fresh mint leaves

    1. Mix the yogurt and agave together in a dish.

    2. Toss all remaining ingredients in a large bowl and gently blend in the yogurt. Let sit 10 minutes before serving to allow flavors to develop.

    Nutrition info per serving (based on 6 servings): 228.1 calories; 6.4 g fat; 4.9 g saturated fat; 5.3 mg cholesterol; 3.1 g protein; 44.3 g carbohydrates; 5.1 g fiber; 24.2 mg sodium

  • The Arnica Cure

    The cheery yellow flowers of Europe’s native arnica plant (Arnica montana) have “had a place in folk medicine for hundreds of years,” says Laurie Steelsmith, ND, LAc, author of Natural Choices for Women’s Health (Three Rivers Press, 2005), “helping those who suffer from bruises, contusions, joint pains, or any kind of physical trauma.” We no

    By Victoria Dolby Toews, MPH