heart health

  • The Case for White Wine

    Anyone with a regular inclination for cabernet or Chianti must have breathed a booze-infused sigh of relief at some point over the past decade, as recent studies have shown that a moderate amount of red wine has major health benefits, including helping to protect the heart, thwart certain cancers, slow the effects of aging, and prevent neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease.

    Move over red, white is healthy, too.
    By Sarah Toland
  • Sugar and Your Heart

    Editor's picture

    Not only can eating too much sweet stuff increase your risk for obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, and other diseases, a new study published in the Journal of American Medical Association discovered that consuming foods with added sugar–that is, any sugars that don’t occur naturally in food, such the sucros

  • Heart Matters

    If you’re thinking, “Why should I worry about heart health?” here’s a reality check: A third of Americans already have some form of the condition. Even if you don’t have a family history of cardiovascular problems, you should take steps to protect your ticker. Why? Because your heart rules the health of every other system in your body.

    Heart disease is still the No. 1 killer of women. Try these 19 simple ways to lower your risk today.
    By Kate Hanley
  • Heart Matters

    If you’re thinking, “Why should I worry about heart health?” here’s a reality check: A third of Americans already have some form of the condition. Even if you don’t have a family history of cardiovascular problems, you should take steps to protect your ticker. Why? Because your heart rules the health of every other system in your body.

    Heart disease is still the No. 1 killer of women. Try these 19 simple ways to lower your risk today.
    by Kate Hanley
  • Better 'Wich Craft

    You already know to steer clear of deli meats, which are loaded with sodium, saturated fat, and cancer-causing nitrates. But just because a ham-and-havarti isn’t the healthiest choice doesn’t mean you have to forsake sandwiches altogether. Here’s how to build a better sandwich, based on what you need:

    For post-workout power …

    By Allison Young
  • Dark Chocolate & Date Truffles

    1 bag or bar of dark chocolate (12 oz)
    1 2/3 cups raw cashews
    8 oz dates, finely chopped
    1/4 teaspoon sea salt
    Zest of 1/2 of an orange

    1. Melt chocolate in double boiler until just melted.
    2. Meanwhile, blend 2/3 cups cashews with 2/3 cups water in blender on high for 30 seconds. Chop remaining cashews and set aside.
    3. Fold together melted chocolate, cashew mixture, dates, sea salt, and orange zest.
    4. Refrigerate until firm, approximately 45 minutes. Roll 3/4-inch balls in hands and then in chopped cashews. Refrigerate until ready to serve. (Note: Truffles will keep in freezer up to 1 month.

    nutrition info per truffle: 105 calories; 5 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 1 mg cholesterol; 1 g protein; 15 g carbohydrates; 1.5 g fiber; 5 mg sodium

  • Vegetable Frittata

    1 tablespoon olive or canola oil
    2 cups sliced mushrooms
    1 medium, julienned red pepper (1 cup)
    2 cups minced broccoli
    1/4 teaspoon dry thyme
    2 cups chopped spinach

    Whisk and set aside:
    12 egg whites
    3 tablespoons skim milk
    (or nondairy alternative)
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon black pepper
    3 tablespoons chives, chopped,
    reserve 1 tablespoon for garnish
    3 oz crumbled goat cheese, reserve
    1 oz for garnish

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms in an even layer, and do not move them for
    3 minutes. Stir, and continue to sauté for about 5 more minutes until they are browned.
    3. Add red pepper, broccoli, and thyme and sauté
    3 to 5 more minutes; add 2 to 4 tablespoons of water if vegetables begin to stick. Add spinach, and toss until wilted.
    4. Spray a 9-inch pie pan with nonstick spray. Sprinkle goat cheese and chives on bottom of pan, then add vegetables. Pour egg whites on top and bake for 25 minutes, uncovered. Cover with foil and bake 10 more minutes. Remove from oven and let rest for 5 to 10 minutes. Garnish with crumbled goat cheese and chopped chives.

    nutrition info per serving (4-6): 216 calories; 11. 4 g fat; 5.8 g saturated fat; 22.3 mg cholesterol; 22.3 g protein; 7.5 g carbohydrates; 2.8 g fiber; 564.6 mg sodium

  • The Scary Truth About Statins

    The notion that high cholesterol causes heart disease has allowed doctors to write millions of prescriptions for cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins that can reduce the risk of it. That seemingly indisputable notion has long suffered from an inconvenient fact: Half the people who have a heart attack don’t have high cholesterol.

    What you need to know before you fill that prescription
    By Erin Quinn
  • The Healthy Heart Diet

    When Mary Anne Nally of Southold, New York, went for her annual physical, she feared what her doctor might say when he saw her blood-test results. “High cholesterol runs in my family, and even though I eat a relatively healthy diet, I had a sneaking suspicion mine was high too,” says the 54-year-old.

    By Lambeth Hochwald / Recipes by Maria Cooper
  • I Heart Garlic

    This Valentine’s Day don’t let the prospect of smooch-repelling garlic breath keep you from protecting your heart. Garlic, specifically a compound called allicin, helps control high blood pressure (aka hypertension)—a dangerous condition that afflicts one in five Americans and increases the risk of heart attacks and stroke.

    By Kristin Bjornsen