Health

  • Muesli

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 1 SERVING

    1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats

    2 tablespoons raisins, unsoaked

    1 tablespoon chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons sunflower or pumpkin seeds, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons maple syrup, whole cane sugar, or coconut sugar (optional)

    1/2 cup Strawberry Cashew Yogurt

    1/4 cup fresh blueberries or sliced strawberries

    Put the oats, raisins, almonds, sunflower seeds, and optional maple syrup in a small bowl. Toss gently to combine. Serve with Strawberry Cashew Yogurt and berries. For soft muesli, soak in 1/4 cup of water for 8 to 12 hours at room temperature. Source: Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People by Jennifer Cornbleet, images courtesy of Warren Jefferson

  • Primal Eating (In a Nutshell)

    Primal eating is booming. The rationale behind it is simple: Our genome hasn’t changed much over the past 10,000 years, but our diet now is very different from what we’re adapted to, leading to a glut of chronic disease. Here’s a quick guide to primal foods:

    Primal supplements

  • Stress: Know Your Signs

    April is Stress Awareness Month and experts have spoken out about the damaging effects stress has on the body. Even those illnesses that just won’t seem to go away could, in fact, be caused by underlying stress. Do you know the signs of stress? If not, here are a few to look for and to bring up to your healthcare profes­sional at your next checkup:

    >> Anxiety

  • Good Stress vs. Bad Stress

    The National Institute of Mental Health defines stress as “the brain’s response to any demand.” Change is thought to be a main trigger for stress, though it can be either positive or negative.

  • Brown Algae as Medicine

    Resourceful seaside residents have been eating seaweed for thousands of years. The Native Americans ate it, many prehistoric cultures did, and it is common in Asian cuisine today. What our ancestors knew, science has confirmed: Seaweeds are a healthy foodstuff.

  • 10 Reasons to Go Organic

    Every year more and more savvy consumers are going organic, and it seems that every year the stakes get higher. From protecting the health of your family in future generations to preventing the collapse of the bee population, shrinking the oceans’ dead zones, and doing your part to reduce climate change, here are 10 research-supported resolutions you can adopt this year.

  • Local Rules

    There was a lot to like in the food projections at the beginning of this year. After perusing many different sources some distinct commonalities emerged—simple, healthy, farm-to-fork, hyper-local sourcing, and sustainability all rang out resoundingly across the food forecasts.

    Functional foods vs. superfoods

    This year in superfoods
    By Adam Swenson
  • Yum! Why Beef, Butter, and Eggs Are Back on the Menu

    If you’ve banished red meats and egg yolks from your diet for health reasons, there’s reason to rejoice. I think the notion that saturated fat and cholesterol are the demons in the diet is 100 percent wrong. When you look at the data, it’s very clear: Most of what we’ve been told about saturated fat and cholesterol is simply not so.

    A surprising list of the new health foods—and some to avoid
    By Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, aka “The Rogue Nutritionist”
  • Food Term: Functional Foods

    Foods that have a health effect beyond basic nutrition. (Or, as the New York Times calls them, “foods with benefits.”) Tomatoes are a great example: Besides being delicious and giving your body some calories to burn, they are loaded with lycopene, a potent antioxidant.

  • The Newest Superfruit

    Know what a buffaloberry is? If not, now is the time. According to new studies, buffaloberries contain high levels of lycopene and methyl-lycopenoate, both which are beneficial for our overall health. This tart red fruit is great fresh or dried. Go check it out and start reaping the benefits.