Health

  • Local Rules

    There was a lot to like in the food projections at the beginning of this year. After perusing many different sources some distinct commonalities emerged—simple, healthy, farm-to-fork, hyper-local sourcing, and sustainability all rang out resoundingly across the food forecasts.

    Functional foods vs. superfoods

    This year in superfoods
    By Adam Swenson
  • The Newest Superfruit

    Know what a buffaloberry is? If not, now is the time. According to new studies, buffaloberries contain high levels of lycopene and methyl-lycopenoate, both which are beneficial for our overall health. This tart red fruit is great fresh or dried. Go check it out and start reaping the benefits.

  • Food Term: Functional Foods

    Foods that have a health effect beyond basic nutrition. (Or, as the New York Times calls them, “foods with benefits.”) Tomatoes are a great example: Besides being delicious and giving your body some calories to burn, they are loaded with lycopene, a potent antioxidant.

  • Yum! Why Beef, Butter, and Eggs Are Back on the Menu

    If you’ve banished red meats and egg yolks from your diet for health reasons, there’s reason to rejoice. I think the notion that saturated fat and cholesterol are the demons in the diet is 100 percent wrong. When you look at the data, it’s very clear: Most of what we’ve been told about saturated fat and cholesterol is simply not so.

    A surprising list of the new health foods—and some to avoid
    By Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS, aka “The Rogue Nutritionist”
  • Planning a Detox?

    American culture prizes speed. After all, we championed fast food, instant coffee, and microwave cooking. But as you’ve probably noticed in these examples, the fast way is not necessarily the best way—and this is particularly true when detoxifying the body.

    Why you need to take it slow
    By Isaac Eliaz, MD, MS, LAc
  • Veggie Power: 3 Juice Recipes to Fight Cold and Flu

    According to the latest CDC Flu Activity & Surveillance report, flu is widespread in 25 states so far this season. As for the common cold, the CDC estimates that more than one billion of us will suffer from it in 2014.

    By Michael T. Murray, ND
  • Strawberry Cashew Yogurt

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 2 SERVINGS

    1 1/2 cups fresh strawberries (about 12) hulled

    1/2 cup soaked cashews

    1 tablespoon maple syrup or agave nectar

    1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

    Sliced fresh strawberries, for serving (optional)

    Put all the ingredients in a blender and process on medium speed until smooth. Serve with sliced strawberries if desired. Stored in a sealed container in the refrig­erator. Strawberry Cashew Yogurt will keep for three days. Source: Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People by Jennifer Corn­bleet, images courtesy of Warren Jefferson

  • Pan-Seared Halibut with Melted Cherry Tomatoes

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    FISH

    4 (4 to 6 ounce) halibut fillets

    ½ teaspoon finely ground unre­fined sea salt

    ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves

    1 tablespoon clarified butter (recipe follows)

    TOMATOES

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    1 shallot, minced

    2 cloves garlic, minced

    1 pound cherry tomatoes, halved

    ¼ cup chopped fresh tarragon

    CLARIFIED BUTTER

    1 pound unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces

    To make the butter, place the butter in a wide sauté pan set over low heat. Allow the butter to melt slowly. As it heats, froth and foam will gather on top of the liquid butter. Skim this off and discard it. Continue heating the butter until it becomes perfectly clear, about 10 minutes. Set a fine-mesh sieve over a bowl and line it with a double layer of cheesecloth or a single layer of butter muslin. Pour the melted butter through the cloth and into the bowl. Discard the milk solids in the cloth, then pour the clarified butter into three 4-ounce jars or one 12-ounce jar and cover tightly.

    To prepare the halibut, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and fresh thyme. Set it on a plate and let it rest a bit while you melt the butter in a wide skillet over medium-high heat. Once the butter melts, arrange the seasoned halibut skin side-down in the hot fat, and sear for four to five minutes, until the skin crisps and browns. Flip the fish, and continue cooking for another two to three minutes, until it flakes easily when pierced by a fork. Transfer the halibut to a serving plate, and tent it with parchment paper or foil to keep it warm.

    To prepare the tomatoes, set the skillet over medium heat and pour the olive oil into the pan that you used to cook the fish. Toss in the shallot and garlic, and sauté them in the oil, stirring frequently, until they release their fragrance and become translucent, about six minutes. Toss in the cherry tomatoes, and sauté them with the garlic and shal­lot until they release their juice and soften in the hot pan, about two minutes. Stir in the tarragon and continue cooking, stirring frequently, for one minute. Uncover the waiting halibut. Spoon the melted cherry tomato mixture over the fish, and serve immediately. Source + image: The Nourished Kitchen by Jennifer McGruther

  • Maple Nut Granola

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 12 CUPS

    4 cups rolled oats

    2 cups crispy brown rice cereal

    1 1/2 cups unsweetened coconut flakes

    1 cup sliced almonds

    1 cup chopped walnuts

    2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

    1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

    1/2 cup virgin coconut oil, melted

    1/2 cup maple syrup

    1 teaspoon almond extract

    Preheat oven to 250 degrees. In large bowl, mix together all dry ingredients. In separate bowl, whisk together oil, syrup, and al­mond extract. Pour wet mixture over dry and stir to coat. Trans­fer mixture to two 9x12-inch glass casserole pans and spread out evenly. Bake 60 minutes or until golden. Turn off oven, but do not remove granola until completely cooled and set. Remove from oven and use spatula to release granola and break into chunks. Store in airtight container. Source: Clean Food by Terry Walters, image by Gentl and Hyers, courtesy of Sterling Epicure