grains

  • Muesli

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 1 SERVING

    1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats

    2 tablespoons raisins, unsoaked

    1 tablespoon chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons sunflower or pumpkin seeds, unsoaked

    2 teaspoons maple syrup, whole cane sugar, or coconut sugar (optional)

    1/2 cup Strawberry Cashew Yogurt

    1/4 cup fresh blueberries or sliced strawberries

    Put the oats, raisins, almonds, sunflower seeds, and optional maple syrup in a small bowl. Toss gently to combine. Serve with Strawberry Cashew Yogurt and berries. For soft muesli, soak in 1/4 cup of water for 8 to 12 hours at room temperature. Source: Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People by Jennifer Cornbleet, images courtesy of Warren Jefferson

  • Quinoa Cilantro Taco Salad

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Serves 4

    2 teaspoons olive oil

    1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

    1 teaspoon cumin

    1/2 teaspoon chili powder

    1/4 teaspoon sea salt

    2 tablespoons poppy seeds

    1 cup quinoa, cooked

    4 cups mixed salad greens

    5 fresh chives

    1/2 cup cabbage, shredded

    6 cherry tomatoes

    1/3 cup sunflower seeds

    1 medium onion, sliced

    1/2 cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped

    2 tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped

    1 medium carrot, cut into matchsticks

    1 cup Crunchmaster Roasted Garlic Multi-Seed Crackers, crushed

    1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

    1 ripe avocado, peeled, pitted, and sliced

    1 papaya, cut into 1/4-inch slices

    Combine olive oil, apple cider vinegar, cumin, chili powder, sea salt, poppy seeds, and quinoa in a large mixing bowl: gently toss to combine. In a large serving bowl, add mixed salad greens, and top with quinoa mixture. Add remaining ingredients: mix well. Source: crunchmaster.com

  • Reviving a Healthy Tradition

    Yes and no. It’s more like returning to a time-honored tradition, but in a modern way. There are manuscripts dated almost 3000 BC that tout the healthful benefits of sprouting grains. Today, makers of sprouted flours are producing the same healthful benefits, but in controlled environments that meet FDA food safety regulations.

    Is Sprouted Flour the Latest Trend in Healthy Eating?
    By Peggy Sutton
  • Health News: University of Wisconsin Plant Breeders Develop a Heart-Healthier Oat

    University of Wisconsin-Madison plant breeders have developed a new oat variety that’s significantly higher in the compound that makes this grain so cardio-friendly.

  • The Mother Grain

    For over 5,000 years, people near the Andes mountains have farmed Chenopodium quinoa, or as the Incas referred to it, “chisaya mama” (mother grain). Quinoa, pronounced keen-wah, was the main source of food for the Incas up until the 1500s, when a Spaniard named Francisco Pizarro destroyed all quinoa fields.

    Give your body the benefits of quinoa.
    By Amy Vergin