gluten-free

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  • What’s in Your Food?

    I picked up my son from school recently to have lunch with him. We went to the park with our sack lunches. As I watched him pull out his carrot sticks and orange slices, I asked him if anyone in the lunch room had a lunch like him with fruits and vegetables. He said his best friend sometimes had celery in his lunch sack but no one else did.

    Whole foods emphasize what’s in your food, not what isn’t
    By Linda Kopec, ND, MHNE, CNC
  • Cook’s Corner: The Perfect Desserts

    Last month we featured a multitude of recipes that are great for your holiday parties. This month, we wanted to give you some great dessert options for any festivity you run into! Because desserts are abundant and basically unavoidable, you’ll want to perhaps prepare and bring your own desserts that are healthier than the standard fare and just as enjoyable.

    Cookie recipes for any social occasion
  • What’s On Our Reading List

    365 Vegan Smoothies: Boost Your Health With a Rainbow of Fruits and Veggies

    (Avery Trade, 2013) by Kathy Patalsky

  • Cook’s Corner: Chili Season Is Upon Us

    Most people grew up with their family chili. Filled with beans, thick and meaty, vegetarian—there are endless possibilities. Then of course there are the toppings: sour cream, cheese, Fritos, or maybe you pair it with some cornbread. As we’ve learned what’s good for your body (and what definitely is not), we see some of those classics in a different light.

  • Gluten Intolerance

    Gluten intolerance is not “just another food intolerance.” In fact, it is one of the most common genetically predisposed chronic inflammatory diseases driven by food. It is also frequently complicated by various metabolic disturbances and autoimmune processes.

    A guide to testing, diagnosis, and treatments
    By Alexander R. Shikhman, MD, PhD, FACR
  • Health News: Gluten-Free? The Answers Just Became Clearer

    More than three million Americans are said to have celiac disease, though most are undiagnosed. Given this troubling epidemic, more consumers are questioning the standards of all the “gluten-free” products on the market now. With no laws or rules governing product labels or restaurant menus, the risk of gluten contamination was higher than it should be. But change is on the way.

  • Gluten-Free Diet Basics

    There are a great many reasons people choose to go gluten-free, and they are doing so in record numbers. If you’re at the point of deciding to cut gluten out—either on a trial basis or as a permanent life change—here are some things you’ll need to know.

    Reasons to go gluten-free     

    How to get started on a gluten-free diet
    By Carla Spacher
  • Carrot Quinoa Muffins

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Makes: 12 muffins

    1 cup cooked quinoa (1/3 cup uncooked)

    1 cup gluten-free flour

    1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

    1/2 teaspoon baking powder

    1/2 teaspoon salt

    1/4 teaspoon baking soda

    2 eggs

    3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce

    1/4 cup light brown sugar, packed

    1/4 cup orange juice

    1 teaspoon orange zest

    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    3/4 cup shredded carrot, lightly pressed dry

    1/2 cup raisins

    1/4 cup walnuts

    Preheat oven to 350. To make quinoa, rinse 1/3 cup of uncooked quinoa for one minute. Place in a small saucepan, add 2/3 cup water, and bring to a boil. Immediately reduce heat to low, cover, and allow to simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit for an additional five minutes, keeping quinoa covered. Fluff with a fork and set aside to cool.

    To plump and soften raisins, place them in a small bowl and cover with boiling water. Let stand 10 minutes, then drain and let cool. In a large bowl, whisk together gluten-free flour, cinnamon, baking powder, salt, and baking soda. Set aside. In a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or in a large mixing bowl) beat together eggs and sugar. Beat in applesauce, orange juice, orange zest, and vanilla extract. Reduce speed to low. Add carrots. Mix in quinoa a little at a time (if quinoa is still warm, this will prevent it from scrambling the eggs) until combined.

    Add carrot-quinoa mixture to the flour mixture, stirring by hand until just combined. Fold in raisins. Evenly divide the batter among 12 cups in a coated baking pan or using pan liners. Bake for 20 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove muffins from pan to cool.

  • Reviving a Healthy Tradition

    Yes and no. It’s more like returning to a time-honored tradition, but in a modern way. There are manuscripts dated almost 3000 BC that tout the healthful benefits of sprouting grains. Today, makers of sprouted flours are producing the same healthful benefits, but in controlled environments that meet FDA food safety regulations.

    Is Sprouted Flour the Latest Trend in Healthy Eating?
    By Peggy Sutton
  • The Gluten-Free Diet and Digestive Health

    The gluten-free movement has gained ground quickly over the past few years, but this is more than a flash-in-the-pan fad dietary trend. For a large segment of the population, there are some very good reasons to go gluten-free that have nothing to do with trending popularity and everything to do with overall health.

    What is gluten?

    Skip the Gluten and Prevent Disease
    By Carla Spacher
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