ginger

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  • All About: Ginger Tea

    WHAT IT IS: Ginger is an underground root-like stem of the ginger (Zingiber officinale) plant. It has a pungent, spicy aroma and is commonly used in cooking, baking, and herbal remedies.

  • Ginger Attacks Nausea At Its Root

    bloggerkleine's picture

    This underground stem, or rhizome, packs a real medicinal wallop.

    There are few things in life more warming and delicious than a slice of warm gingerbread with a spoon of whipped cream on a chilly fall day, but the spicy flavor of ginger is also a marvelous natural remedy for a majority of what ails you.

  • Maple Ginger Pumpkin Pie

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    Crust
    1/2 cup flour
    1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
    1/4 cup hazelnut meal or ground nuts
    1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
    1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    6 tablespoons butter, softened
    6 tablespoons cold orange juice or water
    Optional: 1 tablespoon date sugar

    Filling
    1 15-ounce can pumpkin
    1/4 cup molasses
    1/2 cup pure maple syrup
    1 teaspoon each cinnamon and ground ginger
    1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
    2 eggs, lightly beaten
    1 cup evaporated fat-free milk
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 teaspoon finely grated, peeled ginger root

    1. In a food processor, pulse together flour, nut meal, spices, and butter to form crumbs. Pour mixture into a bowl, and gradually add orange juice or water to form dough. Press into a 9-inch pie plate coated with cooking spray. If desired, sprinkle with date sugar. Bake at 325 degrees for 8 to10 minutes. Remove from oven, and allow to cool.
    2. In a mixing bowl, combine filling ingredients through evaporated milk, blending well. Stir in flour and gingerroot pieces.
    3. Bake at 375 degrees for 55 to 60 minutes. Cool or chill before serving.

    Nutrition info per serving (10): 174 calories; 8 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 52 mg cholesterol; 6 g protein; 46 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 57 mg sodium

  • What's My Alternative: Nausea

    • Cloves (Eugenia aromatica of the family Myrtacae) can be used to alleviate nausea and dizziness when prepared as a tea. Two to five grains* is an appropriate dose for an adult. In tea, cloves generally have a pleasant taste. To brew, pour a cup of boiling water over a teaspoon of dried clove powder.

    Cloves and Ginger Reduce Nausea
  • Dal with Winter Vegetables

    3 tablespoons ghee (clarified butter) or vegetable oil
    1 cup chopped carrots
    1 cup peeled and cubed
    butternut squash
    4 cups water
    1 tablespoon freshly
    grated ginger
    2 teaspoons turmeric
    2 teaspoons ground coriander
    1 teaspoon iodized salt (must be iodized on a sattvic diet)
    1 1/2 cups dried yellow lentils
    2 cups broccoli florets
    1 teaspoon brown
    mustard seed
    2 teaspoons cumin seed
    1 teaspoon fennel seed

    1. Add 2 tablespoons ghee (or oil), carrots, and squash to a large saucepan. Sauté for 8 minutes.
    2. Add water, ginger, turmeric, coriander, salt, and lentils. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for one hour.
    3. Add chopped broccoli and an additional cup of water (omit the water if you prefer a thick dal), and simmer for 10 minutes.
    4. While broccoli is cooking, toast brown mustard, cumin, and fennel in a skillet over high heat for 1 minute, or until spices become fragrant.
    5. Add remaining ghee or oil to the skillet, and sauté 1 minute. Combine with the broccoli and lentil mixture, and serve with basmati rice.

    nutrition info per serving: 158 calories; 7.8 g fat; 1.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 6.2 g protein; 18.6 g carbohydrates; 7.1 g fiber; 417 mg sodium

  • Maple-Ginger Pumpkin Pie

    Crust
    1/2 cup flour, 1/2 cup whole-wheat flour
    1/4 cup hazelnut meal or ground nuts
    1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
    1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    6 tablespoons butter, softened
    6 tablespoons cold orange juice or water
    Optional: 1 tablespoon date sugar

    Filling
    1 15-ounce can pumpkin
    1/4 cup molasses
    1/2 cup pure maple syrup
    1 teaspoon each cinnamon and ground ginger
    1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
    2 eggs, lightly beaten
    1 cup evaporated fat-free milk
    2 tablespoons flour
    1 teaspoon finely grated, peeled gingerroot

    1. In a food processor, pulse together flour, nut meal, spices, and butter to form crumbs. Pour mixture into a bowl, and gradually add orange juice or water to form dough. Press into a 9-inch pie plate coated with cooking spray. If desired, sprinkle with date sugar. Bake at 325 degrees for 8 to10 minutes. Remove from oven, and allow to cool.
    2. In a mixing bowl, combine filling ingredients through evaporated milk, blending well. Stir in flour and gingerroot pieces.
    3. Bake at 375 degrees for 55 to 60 minutes. Cool or chill before serving.

    Nutrition info per serving (10): 174 calories; 8 g fat; 4 g saturated fat; 52 mg cholesterol; 6 g protein; 46 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 57 mg sodium

  • Spice Up Your Health

    There’s good reason to season: Doctors and dietitians agree that your spice rack can be just as essential as your medicine cabinet when it comes to preventing and treating disease. Research consistently shows that many spices and herbs have medicinal qualities and can help prevent everything from cancer to the common cold.

    By Vicky Uhland
  • Gingered Fig and Apple Chutney

    1 medium onion, diced
    1 tablespoon gingerroot, thinly sliced
    1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
    1/2 cup apple juice
    1 cup apple, peeled and chopped
    1/2 cup golden raisins
    1 teaspoon cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom
    4 figs, peeled and diced

    1. In a saucepan, soften onion,. Add gingerroot, apple cider vinegar, apple juice, apple, golden raisins, and ground cinnamon, nutmeg, and cardamom; cook on medium heat.

    2. Add figs and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until juices thicken. Refrigerate before serving.

  • Alternative Medicine Cabinet: Fight Food Poisoning

    From fine dining to take-out Thai, Americans eat out much more than they used to—an average of four times every week. Food poisoning is also on the rise—it’s second only to the common cold in how frequently it strikes. Some 76 million Americans suffer from it each year.

    Bounce back faster with these gentle cures.
    By Victoria Dolby Toews, MPH
  • Green Tea and Ginger Salmon

    3/4 cup water
    1 3-inch gingerroot, grated
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    2 green tea bags
    2 teaspoons plus 2 tablespoons honey
    1 1/2 pounds wild Alaskan salmon, skin removed
    1 tablespoon white miso
    2 tablespoons Dijon or spicy brown mustard

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
    2. Combine water and grated ginger into a small saucepan. Bring to a boil; remove from heat and add garlic, green tea, and 2 teaspoons honey. Cover and let brew for five minutes. Remove tea bags; set mixture aside.
    3. Place salmon in a baking pan and pour green tea mixture over fish. Cover loosely with foil and bake 12 to 15 minutes.
    4. Remove from oven and turn broiler to high. In a small bowl, combine miso, mustard, and 2 tablespoons honey. Spread mixture over fish and broil two minutes.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 379.8 calories; 12.8 g fat; 2.7 g saturated fat; 96.9 mg cholesterol; 46.8 g protein; 15.2 g carbohydrates; 0.2 g fiber; 408.7 mg sodium

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