garlic

  • I Heart Garlic

    This Valentine’s Day don’t let the prospect of smooch-repelling garlic breath keep you from protecting your heart. Garlic, specifically a compound called allicin, helps control high blood pressure (aka hypertension)—a dangerous condition that afflicts one in five Americans and increases the risk of heart attacks and stroke.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Spice Up Your Health

    There’s good reason to season: Doctors and dietitians agree that your spice rack can be just as essential as your medicine cabinet when it comes to preventing and treating disease. Research consistently shows that many spices and herbs have medicinal qualities and can help prevent everything from cancer to the common cold.

    By Vicky Uhland
  • Olive Tapenade

    1 cup pitted Kalamata olives
    1 canned sardine fillet
    2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
    1/2 tablespoon capers
    2 cloves garlic
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 teaspoon sugar (optional)

    Blend all ingredients in a food processor or blender until pureed.

    Nutrition info per serving (4 to 6): 160.4 calories; 15 g fat; 0.7 g saturated fat; 2.8 mg cholesterol; 0.6 g protein; 6.1 g carbohydrates; 0.1 g fiber; 712.9 mg sodium

  • Garlic Curry Cauliflower

    1 large head fresh cauliflower, cut into florets
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1/2 cup yellow onion, diced
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1 tablespoon fresh gingerroot, minced
    1 cup light coconut milk
    1 tablespoon curry powder
    1/4 teaspoon white pepper
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 cup fresh cilantro, minced

    1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
    2. In an 8-inch-square glass casserole, coat cauliflower with olive oil. Roast 10 minutes.
    3. Combine onion, garlic, ginger, coconut milk, curry powder, white pepper, and salt.
    4. Pour coconut milk mixture over the cauliflower, cover loosely with foil, and roast for 20 to 25 minutes, until cauliflower is tender. Remove from oven and stir in cilantro.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 186 calories; 13.5 g fat; 6.4 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 5.4 g protein; 15.6 g carbohydrates; 6.2 g fiber; 359.5 mg sodium

  • The Anti-Aging Diet

    Anti-aging. We see the term everywhere, from magazine covers and supplements labels to beauty creams and exercise regimes—all promising to make us look and feel younger. While you can’t avoid getting older, one thing is clear: The foods you eat play a crucial role in keeping your body healthy and your brain functioning well into your senior years.

    10 foods to help you look and feel younger
    By Lisa Turner
  • Soothe Arthritis, Tastefully

    Richard Blau, MD, author of Too Young to Feel Old: The Arthritis Doctor’s 28-Day Formula for Pain-Free Living (DeCapo, 2007) shares his top picks for foods that ease joint pain—and explains why they work.

    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Ginger-Garlic Kale With Tempeh

    1/4 cup reduced-sodium tamari
    2 tablespoons agave
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon dried, crushed red pepper
    1 3-inch segment gingerroot, grated
    1 8-ounce package tempeh, cut into
    1/2-inch cubes
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 small yellow onion, halved and thinly sliced
    1 bunch kale, stems removed and chopped
    2 tablespoons black sesame seeds

    1. In a small bowl, combine tamari, agave, garlic, and red pepper. Squeeze grated ginger over the bowl to extract juice; discard solids. Stir to mix well.

    2. Add tempeh to marinade, stir to coat, and let marinate for one hour at room temperature. Remove tempeh from marinade using a slotted spoon; reserve marinade.

    3. In a large skillet, heat oil, and sauté onion and marinated tempeh for fi ve to six minutes, until onions are tender.

    4. Wash kale, and shake dry. Add to pan, along with remaining marinade; cover and cook until kale is tender and bright green, three to four minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

    5. Transfer to individual plates, and sprinkle with black sesame seeds. Serve immediately.

    Nutrition info per serving (4): 266 calories; 12 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 16 g protein; 28 g carbohydrates; 3 g fiber; 651 mg sodium

  • 8 Essential Flu Fighters

    If instead of ringing in the New Year you’re sneezing, wheezing, and coughing it in, ’tis the season to fortify your immune system. Along with getting sufficient sleep, washing your hands, and stocking up on fruits and vegetables, our experts recommend keeping the following herbs and oils on hand to prevent and treat colds this winter.

    Keep these remedies on hand to ward off winter bugs.
    By Gina Roberts-Grey