fruit

  • Triple Berry Cobbler

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Makes: 12 giant or 24 party servings

    About 2 2/3 cups blueberries

    About 2 2/3 cup raspberries

    About 2 1/2 cups marionberries

    1 1/4 cups sugar

    1/4 cup cornstarch

    1/4 cup lemon juice

    Topping

    1 cup butter, room temperature

    1 cup sugar

    2 tablespoons vanilla extract

    2/3 cup cornmeal

    2/3 cup tapioca starch

    1/3 cup potato starch

    1/3 cup rice flour

    1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder

    1 teaspoon salt

    1 teaspoon cinnamon

    1/2 teaspoon cardamom

    1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum

    1 cup milk

    2 tablespoons coarse sanding sugar or granulated sugar, for topping

    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. In a large bowl, toss together the blueberries, raspberries, marionberries, sugar, cornstarch, and lemon juice to evenly coat the berries. Pour into a 9x13-inch baking pan. To make the topping, cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Blend in the vanilla. In a separate bowl, combine the cornmeal, starches, rice flour, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, cardamom, and xanthan gum. Add the dry ingredients to the butter mixture in three additions, alternating with the milk. Pour the topping over the berry filling. Sprinkle the sanding sugar evenly over the topping and bake until the topping is cooked through, a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, and the berry filling is hot and bubbly, 65 to 70 minutes. Serve hot or cold. Source: Sweet Cravings by Kyra Bussanich, image by Leela Cyd

  • The Newest Superfruit

    Know what a buffaloberry is? If not, now is the time. According to new studies, buffaloberries contain high levels of lycopene and methyl-lycopenoate, both which are beneficial for our overall health. This tart red fruit is great fresh or dried. Go check it out and start reaping the benefits.

  • In Season: Lemons

    Lemons are poised to step into the spotlight this year, and the Eureka/Lisbon, Meyer, and seedless varieties are all in season now. Lemons originated in Southeast Asia and entered Europe via Southern Italy during the time of ancient Rome. Christopher Columbus introduced lemons to the West when he brought them to Hispaniola (modern Haiti) in 1493.

  • Abundance in Our Midst

    240,000 pounds—that’s the amount of fresh fruit Craig Diserens, executive director at Village Harvest, said their organization harvested in 2013.

    How Village Harvest is helping feed communities with surplus fruit
    By Amy Vergin
  • Cook’s Corner: Healthy Holidays

    You’ve been here before. Extended trip to the family’s for the holidays. At least two sit-down meals and a table filled with more desserts than you can feed yourself. By the time the trip is said and done, you’ve probably consumed more than several thousand calories… and none of them in the “healthy” department.

  • Island Creamy Fruit Salad

    Weekly Recipe: 
    Weekly
    [title]

    2 medium bananas, diced

    2 medium apples, diced

    1 lemon (juice of)

    1 (20 ounce) can pineapple tidbits, drained, juice reserved

    2 cups sliced strawberries

    2 cups grapes

    1/4 cup pecans, chopped

    1 (1 1/2 ounce) box sugar-free instant vanilla pudding mix or 1 (1 1/2 ounce) box vegetarian sugar-free instant vanilla pudding mix

    1/2 cup water

    Combine bananas, apples, and lemon juice in large mixing bowl. Toss until evenly coated. Add pineapple, strawberries, grapes, and pecans. In small mixing bowl, combine pudding mix, water, and pineapple juice with a wire whisk until smooth. Add pudding mixture to fruit. Mix gently until thoroughly coated. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Source: Chef Charles Mattocks

  • Superfood: Apples—Quite the Reputation

    If you thought you knew all there was to know about apples, you’re wrong. An apple a day keeps the doctor away, one bad apple spoils the bunch—while these clichés are true, they are only half the story.

    The mythology

    On apples, love, and health
    By Amy Vergin
  • Health News: Juicing: Pulp Fiction?

    Though juicing is gaining ground culturally, it’s not widely recommended within the medical and surgical weight-loss community.

  • In Season: Strawberries

    Strawberries are one of summer’s most beloved fruits, hitting peak season from April to July. The wild strawberry has existed for over 2,000 years. Now there are over 600 varieties, all differing in flavor, size, and texture. The most commonly cultivated species is Fragaria ananassa.

  • Just Raw: Satisfying Summer Drinks

    The joys of summer are endless: sunshine, being outdoors, relaxing on sandy beaches, and biking along park trails. And what better way to cool off than with some healthy summer drinks?

    Not so fast: just because you are drinking a sports drink or refreshing lemonade doesn’t mean it’s good for you. It could actually be loaded with sugar.

    Say yes to fruit and no to sugar