• Let Food Be Thy Medicine

    How many prescription medications did you take this morning? Do you know what they do? What ingre­dients are found within the core of that little capsule? Today we can simply take a pill to remedy any ache and keep your body running smoothly … or so they say. In fact, the path to health doesn’t run through a pharmacy—it can be found right on your dinner plate.

    Finding health on your dinner plate
    By Amy Vergin
  • Cleanse Yourself of Frankenfoods

    The fight to label genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in foods has always been a challenge. Large companies like Monsanto, Cargill, Nestlé, and others are opposed to GMO labeling. In 2012, California Proposition 37—a proposition seeking to label GMO food in California and keep said foods from being called “natural”—was rejected.

    Learn how to avoid GMOs the next time you shop
    By Amy Vergin
  • Slow Food for the Holidays

    The upcoming holidays of Thanksgiving and Christmas are about emphasizing what is best about us, about giving thanks, celebrating the spiritual, and practicing generosity. The slow food movement would like us to extend this focus to our food.

  • Cook’s Corner: Healthy Holidays

    You’ve been here before. Extended trip to the family’s for the holidays. At least two sit-down meals and a table filled with more desserts than you can feed yourself. By the time the trip is said and done, you’ve probably consumed more than several thousand calories… and none of them in the “healthy” department.

  • Health News: Slow Down to be Skinny

    A new study out of Sweden shows that keeping food in the mouth for longer periods (achieved by taking smaller bites and/or chewing longer) reduces overall meal size and increases feelings of fullness. Slowing down the eating rate, the authors say, could help eaters to control their food intake and thus help to reduce obesity.

  • Health Tips: Sleepless Nights Tied to Junk Food Cravings

    Sleepless nights impair the brain’s frontal lobe, which controls complex decision making. They increase activity, however, in the brain centers that respond to rewards, according to a recent study from UC Berkeley. Corresponding to this, the study authors also noticed that subjects strongly favored unhealthy snack and junk foods when running on low sleep.

  • Stuffed Turkey

    Over the years, I have seen that we often eat more than intended over the holidays. It is an easy mistake to make, after all. A little sneak of cookie dough here, a bite of turkey there, a sip of egg nog—you get the picture. And that’s all before the meal starts!

    Overeating doesn’t have to be synonymous with the holidays
    By Amy Vergin
  • Foods That Heal

    The chemical makeup of your body is like the soil that we grow plants in. For your body to grow and heal, your chemical makeup needs to be full of balanced nutrients, just as soil has to be full of balanced nutrients for us to raise beautiful and healthy plants.

    Change your diet, boost your health!
    By Heather Tick, MD
  • Creamy Polenta

    Weekly Recipe: 

    1 1/2 cups water (or two cups of water and only one cup milk)

    1 1/2 cups plain unsweetened nondairy milk (almond or soy preferred)

    1/2 teaspoon sea salt

    1 cup dried polenta (corn grits; I used Bob’s Red Mill brand)

    2 to 2 1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

    2 tablespoons nutritional yeast (optional, but give it a try!)

    1/2 to 1 teaspoon lemon zest

    Freshly ground black pepper (optional)

    Bring the water, milk, and salt to a boil in a medium-size pot over high heat, then lower the heat to low and begin to whisk the polenta. Add it somewhat slowly, whisking as you go. Cook, stirring, for about five minutes, until thickened. Add the oil, nutritional yeast, lemon zest, and pepper, if desired, and stir. Taste; add additional salt if desired. Serve immediately. To thin, add a little extra water or milk. Source: Let Them Eat Vegan! by Dreena Burton

  • Wild Mushroom Risotto

    Weekly Recipe: 

    Wild Mushroom Mixture

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 cup sliced shiitake mushrooms

    1 cup sliced oyster mushrooms

    1 cup sliced maitake mushrooms

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper


    2 tablespoons olive oil

    1/2 cup finely diced onion

    1 clove garlic, sliced

    1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

    1 1/2 cups Arborio rice

    1/2 cup white wine

    5 cups water or low-sodium vegetable stock

    3 tablespoons nutritional yeast

    2 teaspoons salt

    1/2 teaspoon black pepper

    In a large pot or sauté pan, heat the oil for the mushroom mixture over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, mushrooms, and thyme and sauté to soften, five to eight minutes. Season with the salt and black pepper, transfer to a bowl, and reserve. To the same pot, over medium heat, add the oil for the risotto. Add the onion, garlic, and thyme and cook until soft, about three minutes. Add the rice and toast for two minutes. Pour in the wine and cook one minute, scraping any browned bits off the bottom of the pot. Add two cups of the water or stock and turn the heat to high. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat back to medium. Allow the risotto to simmer, stirring every two minutes, until the liquid reduces by half. Add two more cups of water or stock and repeat. Add the remaining one cup of water or stock and stir frequently until most of the liquid has been absorbed by the rice but the rice is still loose. Add the wild mushroom mixture back to the pot, stir in the nutritional yeast, and season with the salt and black pepper. Serve immediately. Source: The Vegucation of Robin by Robin Quivers