fish

  • Light Shrimp Salad

    1 pound cooked shrimp, deveined, shells and tails removed
    1/2 cup lime juice, preferably fresh-squeezed
    1/2 cup lemon juice, preferably fresh-squeezed
    3/4 cup white onion, diced
    1 jalapeño pepper, stemmed, seeded, and diced
    1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro
    1 tomato, seeded and diced
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    Salt, to taste

    1. Chop shrimp into chunks and combine with the next three ingredients in a medium-sized bowl; let sit, refrigerated, for 1 to 4 hours. Since the shrimp is already cooked, this allows the flavors to meld, rather than letting the citrus juice actually cook the fish, like in a ceviche.
    2. Just before serving, stir in the remaining ingredients. Serve with tortilla chips.

    nutrition info per serving (6): 119.1 calories; 3.2 g fat; 0.5 g saturated fat; 147.3 mg cholesterol; 16.5 g protein; 6.6 g carbohydrates; 1 g fiber; 172.4 mg sodium

  • What a Catch

    Lobster and tuna and barramundi—oh my! Standing in front of the fish counter isn’t as easy as it used to be. Tuna or tilapia, salmon or sardines, farmed or wild, fresh or frozen—the choices are enough to make my head swim … I mean spin. Plus, I’m nursing a newborn, and it just seems easier to skip seafood altogether instead of making the wrong choice.

    How to choose the most sustainable seafood
    By Allison Young / Recipes by Rebecca Caro
  • Fishy Findings

    If you favor fish in your diet for its health-boosting omega-3s, you need to take a hard look at where your fillets come from before you choose them.

    By Erinn Morgan
  • Turning the Tides

    Buying seafood these days is no easy feat. With wild fish stocks disappearing fast and concerns about the safety of farmed fish rising (not to mention the negative impact it’s having on the ocean environment) health-conscious consumers want to know which is better: wild or farmed?

    The smartest seafood choices for your health—and the Earth.
    By Alison Anton
  • Pan-Seared Halibut Steaks

    2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    2 tablespoons herbes de Provence spice blend (or 1 1/2 teaspoons each dried thyme, rosemary, savory and lavender)
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    2 wild Pacific halibut steaks, 1/2 pound each
    1 garlic clove, minced
    1/4 to 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
    1/4 teaspoon sugar
    Zest of 1/2 lemon (for garnish)

    1. Mix flour, dried herbs, salt, and pepper in a small dish. Rub over all sides of the fish.

    2. Heat oil over medium heat in large sauté pan. When pan is hot but not smoking, place the fish into the pan. Cook four minutes, flip and cook another three to four minutes on the other side, until the fish flakes open.

    3. Remove fish from pan and quickly add garlic, cooking 30 seconds. Add lemon juice and sugar, whisking to bring up the browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer one to two minutes to reduce the sauce. Drizzle over fish and garnish with lemon zest.

    Nutrition info per serving (2): 481 calories; 20.6 g fat; 2.9 g saturated fat; 92.9 mg cholesterol; 61.7 g protein; 10 g carbohydrates; 1.7 g fiber; 1,321 mg sodium

  • ASk The Doctor: Mercury Exposure

    You bring up an excellent question, and I hear it at my clinic almost weekly. Your experience at the doctor’s office mirrors the typical approach to heavy-metal testing—if the physician tests you at all.

    My family doctor tested my blood for heavy-metal poisoning and told me he saw no sign of lead or mercury. I’ve since heard that the test he used may not be very accurate. Should I get retested?
    By Paul S. Anderson, ND
  • Ask The Doctor: Mercury Exposure

    You bring up an excellent question, and I hear it at my clinic almost weekly. Your experience at the doctor’s office mirrors the typical approach to heavy-metal testing—if the physician tests you at all.

    My family doctor tested my blood for heavy-metal poisoning and told me he saw no sign of lead or mercury. I’ve since heard that the test he used may not be very accurate. Should I get retested?
    By Paul S. Anderson, ND