fish

Page
  • Salmon with Sherry Tomato Sauce

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

    1 shallot, finely chopped

    ¾ teaspoon kosher salt, divided

    ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided

    ½ cup dry sherry

    ½ cup low-sodium chicken stock

    9 ounces cherry tomatoes, quartered (about 2 cups)

    1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

    1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon

    1 (1 ½-pound) skinless salmon fillet

    Soak the plank for at least 1 hour and up to 24 hours.

    Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the shallot, ½ teaspoon of the salt, and ¼ teaspoon of the pepper. Cook 3 to 5 minutes, stirring often, until softened. Add the sherry and chicken stock and bring to a boil. Cook until the sauce is reduced to ½ cup, about 10 minutes. Add the tomatoes, vinegar, and tarragon and stir to combine. Remove the pan from the heat and let the sauce cool to room temperature.

    Prepare the plank for grilling. Season the salmon with the remaining ¼ teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Place the salmon on the toasted side of the plank. Spoon the sauce evenly over the salmon and close the lid. Grill for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the salmon flakes easily with a fork.

    Source: © 2014 by Dina Guillen. Reprinted from Plank Grilling: 75 Recipes for Infusing Food with Flavor Using Wood Planks with permission from Sasquatch Books. Image by Rina Jordan.

  • Ceviche Lettuce Cups

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    2 pounds fresh halibut cut into 1/2-inch dice

    1 cup fresh lime juice

    1/2 cup fresh lemon juice

    1 medium cucumber chopped into 1/2-inch dice

    1/2 medium white onion chopped into 1/2-inch dice

    2 medium tomatoes chopped into 1/2-inch dice

    1/3 cup chopped cilantro

    2 ripe avocados, peeled, pitted, and diced

    Iceberg lettuce, cut inner leaves into 3-inch triangles

    Heidi’s Salsa: Original Mild, Happy Medium, or Chupacabra’s Revenge

    Sea salt

    Freshly ground black pepper

    Lace fish, onions, and cilantro in a cas­serole dish. Cover with lime and lemon juice. Let sit covered in the refrigerator for three hours until fish starts to turn from translucent to opaque. Then, add cu­cumber, tomatoes, cilantro, avocado, and a dash of salt and pepper. Let sit for one more hour and remove from refrigerator. Arrange lettuce triangles on a serving tray and spoon ceviche mixture onto each of the triangles. For thinner lettuce pieces, stack two triangles on top of each other. Serve with Heidi’s Salsa. Source: Luko Foods

  • Roasted Salmon and Asparagus with Lemon-Caper-Dill Aioli

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    MAKES 4 SERVINGS

    FOR SALMON AND ASPARAGUS

    1 pound asparagus, trimmed

    Cooking spray

    1 tablespoon olive oil

    1/2 teaspoon salt, divided

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper, divided

    1 1/2 pounds skinless salmon fillet

    FOR AIOLI

    3/4 cup mayonnaise

    1 clove garlic, minced

    1 teaspoon finely grated organic lemon rind

    1 tablespoon lemon juice

    1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill

    1 tablespoon chopped capers

    2 teaspoons finely minced red onion

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    To make the salmon and asparagus: Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Arrange the asparagus in an even layer on a rimmed baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Drizzle with the olive oil and sprinkle with half the salt and pepper. Place the salmon fillet directly on top of the asparagus. Sprinkle with the remaining salt and pepper. Roast the salmon for 18 minutes or until the fish flakes when tested with a fork.

    To make the aioli, combine the mayonnaise and the re­maining ingredients in a small bowl until well blended. Serve the salmon and asparagus with aioli. Source: Fast and Simple Gluten-Free by Gretchen F. Brown, RD

  • Pan-Seared Halibut with Melted Cherry Tomatoes

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES 4

    FISH

    4 (4 to 6 ounce) halibut fillets

    ½ teaspoon finely ground unre­fined sea salt

    ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves

    1 tablespoon clarified butter (recipe follows)

    TOMATOES

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    1 shallot, minced

    2 cloves garlic, minced

    1 pound cherry tomatoes, halved

    ¼ cup chopped fresh tarragon

    CLARIFIED BUTTER

    1 pound unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces

    To make the butter, place the butter in a wide sauté pan set over low heat. Allow the butter to melt slowly. As it heats, froth and foam will gather on top of the liquid butter. Skim this off and discard it. Continue heating the butter until it becomes perfectly clear, about 10 minutes. Set a fine-mesh sieve over a bowl and line it with a double layer of cheesecloth or a single layer of butter muslin. Pour the melted butter through the cloth and into the bowl. Discard the milk solids in the cloth, then pour the clarified butter into three 4-ounce jars or one 12-ounce jar and cover tightly.

    To prepare the halibut, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and fresh thyme. Set it on a plate and let it rest a bit while you melt the butter in a wide skillet over medium-high heat. Once the butter melts, arrange the seasoned halibut skin side-down in the hot fat, and sear for four to five minutes, until the skin crisps and browns. Flip the fish, and continue cooking for another two to three minutes, until it flakes easily when pierced by a fork. Transfer the halibut to a serving plate, and tent it with parchment paper or foil to keep it warm.

    To prepare the tomatoes, set the skillet over medium heat and pour the olive oil into the pan that you used to cook the fish. Toss in the shallot and garlic, and sauté them in the oil, stirring frequently, until they release their fragrance and become translucent, about six minutes. Toss in the cherry tomatoes, and sauté them with the garlic and shal­lot until they release their juice and soften in the hot pan, about two minutes. Stir in the tarragon and continue cooking, stirring frequently, for one minute. Uncover the waiting halibut. Spoon the melted cherry tomato mixture over the fish, and serve immediately. Source + image: The Nourished Kitchen by Jennifer McGruther

  • The Changing Face of Omega-3s

    Fish oil has long been the king of omega-3s, but the field is changing. Omega-3s show up in a wide variety of foods and supplements originating from both plants and animals. They come in three varieties (each of which have their own merits), are an essential part of the membrane of each cell in the body, and help correct or prevent a long list of conditions.

    Why we need them and where to get them
    By Adam Swenson
  • Focus On: Omega-3

    WHAT IT IS: Omega-3s are essential fatty acids that the body needs to work properly. The body does not produce them—we need to consume them through supplementation or natural sources. Almost 99 percent of the US population does not eat enough omega-3s, and deficiency symptoms range from fatigue to depression.

  • 5 Tips for Eating Seafood Safely

    If you read health and diet magazines, you’ve probably learned that eating seafood is good for you. But is it possible to have too much of a good thing? Kelli M.

  • Health Tips: Something’s (NOT) Fishy Here

    200 mg DHA or EPA the average American consumes daily

    500 mg American Heart Association’s recommendation

    900 mg recommendation for those with coronary disease

  • Health News: Fish Peptide Inhibits Cancer Metastasis

    A peptide (protein) identified recently by a group of researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and derived from Pacific cod may inhibit the spread of prostate, and possibly other cancers. Hafiz Ahmed, PhD, said, “The use of natural dietary products with antitumor activity is an important and emerging field of research.

  • Omega-3 Still Matters

    Hundreds of clinical trials on the possible benefits of omega-3 fatty acids have produced conflicting results and varied claims, leaving frustrated consumers unsure what to believe.

Page