eggs

  • Fresh Herb Frittata

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    SERVES: 6

    9 eggs

    2 tablespoons heavy cream

    2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

    2 tablespoons snipped fresh chives

    1 teaspoon chopped fresh dill

    1 teaspoon chopped fresh chervil

    2 tablespoons unsalted butter

    Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Break open the eggs into a large mixing bowl, pour in the cream, and beat them together until loosely combined. Whisk in the herbs. Melt the butter in an ovenproof skillet over medium-low heat; when it froths, pour in the beaten eggs with cream and herbs. Let the eggs cook, undisturbed, for five minutes or until the bottom of the frittata is cooked through, but the top is still liquid. Transfer to the oven and bake for five minutes before serving. Source + image: The Nourished Kitchen by Jennifer McGruther

  • “Choose Cage-Free” Campaign

    Did you know that ninety-five percent of egg-laying hens in the US live their entire lives in small cages that they share with five or six other birds? These chickens—intelligent, social animals—cannot spread their wings or even turn around.

  • Ratatouille with Scrambled Egg Whites

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly

    Ingredients:

    2 cloves minced garlic

    1 onion, diced

    4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

    2 zucchini, sliced

    1 green bell pepper, diced

    1 Japanese/Chinese eggplant, sliced

    2 tomatoes, diced

    1/2 teaspoon salt

    2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley

    2 teaspoons dried basil

    1 teaspoon dried oregano

    1 teaspoon salt

    8 egg whites

     

    1. In a skillet, sauté garlic and onion in 2 tablespoons olive oil for 1 to 2 minutes over medium heat.

    2. Add zucchini and bell pepper, and continue to sauté over medium heat for another 3 to 4 minutes.

    3. Add eggplant and continue to sauté over medium heat until all vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, salt, and all the herbs. Mix well and set aside.

    4. In a skillet, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Add egg whites; cook until the whites are set but still moist.

    5. Place scrambled eggs on a large plate and top with ratatouille.

    Serves 6

    Nutrition info per serving: 194 calories; 12 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 1 mg cholesterol; 12 g protein; 11 g carbohydrates; 5 g fiber; 543 mg sodium

  • Ratatouille With Scrambled Egg Whites

    2 cloves minced garlic
    1 onion, diced
    4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    2 zucchini, sliced
    1 green bell pepper, diced
    1 Japanese/Chinese eggplant, sliced
    2 tomatoes, diced
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley
    2 teaspoons dried basil
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon salt
    8 egg whites

    1. In a skillet, sauté garlic and onion in 2 tablespoons olive oil for 1 to 2 minutes over medium heat.
    2. Add zucchini and bell pepper, and continue to sauté over medium heat for another 3 to 4 minutes.
    3. Add eggplant and continue to sauté over medium heat until all vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, salt, and all the herbs. Mix well and set aside.
    4. In a skillet, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Add egg whites; cook until the whites are set but still moist.
    5. Place scrambled eggs on a large plate and top with ratatouille.

    nutrition info per serving (6): 194 calories; 12 g fat; 2 g saturated fat; 1 mg cholesterol; 12 g protein; 11 g carbohydrates; 5 g fiber; 543 mg sodium

  • Egg-cellent News for Dieters

    Before you start yet another diet du jour, consider this: Eating two eggs a day for breakfast helps you lose 65 percent more weight and gain more energy than a bagel of equal calories, says a recent study from the International Journal of Obesity.

    By Nicole Sprinkle
  • 3 Foods That Fight Belly Fat

    Can’t seem to shed that spare tire around your middle, despite your best diet attempts? New research suggests that your belly fat itself could be to blame. In a study on rats, scientists found that fat cells within the abdomen produce a hormone called neuropeptide Y (NPY), an appetite stimulant previously thought to originate only in the brain.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Egg-White Breakfast Casserole

    1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
    1/2 cup onions, diced
    12 egg whites
    1/4 cup fat-free milk
    2 slices whole-wheat bread, torn into pieces
    1 cup broccoli fl orets, steamed
    1 cup spinach, stems removed, steamed
    Pinch nutmeg
    Fresh ground pepper and sea salt, to taste
    2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese
    1 1/2 cups fat-free milk
    3 to 4 whole cloves; 3 to 4 peppercorns
    1 slice of onion
    1 clove garlic
    1/4 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes
    2 teaspoons oil drained from sun-dried
    tomatoes
    2 1/2 teaspoons whole-wheat fl our
    Cayenne, sea salt, pepper to taste

    1. Heat a large saucepan over medium heat. Add olive oil and onions. Cook until caramelized.

    2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9- by 9-inch baking dish. Whisk egg whites and milk. Season with cayenne, sea salt, and pepper. Spread bread pieces along bottom of pan; top with caramelized onions, broccoli fl orets, and spinach. Pour on the egg-white mixture. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper, and the Parmesan cheese. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes.

    3. While casserole bakes, put milk, cloves, peppercorns, and a slice of onion in a small pot. Cook over medium-high heat about five minutes. Remove from heat. Let stand for 15 minutes.

    4. Mince garlic and drained sun-dried tomatoes.

    5. Drain milk through a strainer into a bowl to remove cloves, peppercorns, and onion. In same pot, over medium heat, add oil and fl our. Stir to make a roux. Slowly add milk, whisking in a little at a time. When thickened, whisk in sun-dried tomatoes and garlic. Season with salt, pepper, and cayenne to taste.

    6. Serve casserole slices with a tablespoon of sundried tomato cream sauce on top.


    Nutrition info per serving (based on 6): 152 calories; 3.2 g fat; 0.7 g saturated fat; 2.7 mg cholesterol; 14.5 g protein; 17.3 g carbohydrates; 2.9 g fi ber; 304 mg sodium

  • Start Your Day Warm and Healthy

    I am a huge fan of breakfast. I coach my busy husband on the importance of squeezing in that first meal of the day and insist on sending our kids off to school after a substantial and healthy meal. After all, a brain needs fuel to function, including glucose, vitamins, minerals and other essential nutrients.

    By Karen Albright Lin