eco-living

  • Eco-Eggs to Dye For

    When it comes time to dye Easter eggs, go green. Create brightly colored eggs by using natural ingredients from your fridge and pantry. Stay away from those egg-dyeing kits sold in craft stores and supermarkets—they contain coal tar and other petroleum-based products. Plus, studies have linked certain food dyes to health problems like allergies, chromosome damage, and cancer.

  • In Your Own Backyard

    The typical patient at the Environmental Health Clinic at New York University comes in concerned about the water flowing from her tap, the air she breathes, and the chemicals her kids are exposed to at home. Sound familiar? The list of environmental health concerns seems to grow everyday, along with the clinic’s roster of clients.

    Reduce the toxins in your environment with these close-to-home solutions.
    By Samantha Cleaver
  • Create an Eco-Chic Nursery

    Pick the right paint
    Choose paint with low or no VOCs (volatile organic compounds) to protect your baby from breathing in these harmful chemicals, which are commonly found in regular paint. If you opt for a low-VOC paint, choose one with a VOC level of less than 10 mg per liter.

    Know your flooring

    From toys to cribs, harmful toxins lurk in some of the most popular products for children. Here’s what you need to know to keep your baby safe.
    By Jodi Helmer