diabetes

  • Vegetarian Mixed-Bean Chili Express

    6 cloves garlic, minced or crushed
    1 tablespoon chili powder (preferably a dark variety, such as ancho)
    1 tablespoon dried oregano
    1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
    1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    1 can (28 ounces) low-sodium diced tomatoes
    1 1/2 cups cooked or 1 can (15 ounces) pinto beans, rinsed and drained
    1 1/2 cups cooked or 1 can (15 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained
    1 1/2 cups cooked or 1 can (15 ounces) small red or red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
    3 cups hot water
    1 1/2 cups dry textured vegetable protein
    1 cup frozen whole-kernel corn
    1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
    1 tablespoon hot-pepper sauce
    1 tablespoon onion powder
    1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
    1 teaspoon sugar
    2 tablespoons cornmeal or masa harina
    Salt to taste

    Steam-fry the garlic in a large, heavy nonstick skillet for 2 minutes. Add the chili powder, oregano, cumin, and red pepper and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add the tomatoes (with juice), beans, hot water, vegetable protein, corn bell pepper, soy sauce, hot-pepper sauce, onion powder, cocoa, and sugar. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat, cover, and simmer for 15 to 30 minutes. During the last 5 minutes of cooking sprinkle the cornmeal or masa harina over the top and stir thoroughly. Season with the salt.


    Per serving (6): 329 calories, 26 g protein, 57 g carbohydrates, 7 g sugar, 2 g total fat, 4% calories from fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 16 g fiber, 457 mg sodium  

  • Chocolate-Dipped Strawberries

    1/4 cup Wax Orchards fudge topping
    12 large fresh whole strawberries, cleaned, with stems

    Heat the topping in a small saucepan just until softened. Divide equally into 2 small bowls. Hold strawberries by the stem ends, dip in the topping, and enjoy!

    MAKES 2 SERVINGS

    Per serving: 125 calories, 1 g protein, 29 g carbohydrates, 23 g sugar, 1 g total fat, 5% calories from fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 4 g fiber, 41 mg sodium

  • The Diabetes Cure

    Rosa Gonzalez knew firsthand about the disasters of type-2 diabetes—a condition that results when your body stops responding normally to insulin, a hormone that pulls sugar from the bloodstream into cells, where it’s used for energy.

    Forget counting carbs. Here's the new way to reverse this disease.
    By William Gottlieb
  • Brush Away Diabetes

    Gum disease may do more than ruin your beautiful smile—it may also increase your risk of type-2 diabetes.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • The Super Soaker

    Soaking brown rice overnight before cooking releases a compound called ASG (acylated steryl glucoside) that may help diabetics ward off disease-related nerve and vascular damage. New research in the Journal of Lipid Research shows that ASG helps normalize blood sugar by increasing levels of good enzymes that diabetes destroys.

    By Wendy McMillan
  • Ask The Doctor: Diabetes & Artifical Sweeteners

    As you know, when you eat sugar (or simple carbohydrates), your blood glucose levels rise, and your pancreas releases insulin to usher the sugar into cells. As a diabetic, however, you either don’t produce enough insulin or your cells don’t respond to the insulin (or both), and your blood glucose levels remain sky high.

    I’m diabetic. Should I use artificial sweeteners, such as Splenda or NutraSweet, instead of sugar?
    By Lisa Lanzano, RD