diabetes

  • Heal Your Skin

    As if people with diabetes didn’t have enough to deal with, those managing this blood-glucose imbalance also face special skincare challenges. The small capillaries close to a diabetic’s skin often become narrowed, which slows circulation and makes skin more prone to problems.

    For diabetics experiencing inceased skin sensitivity, here's help.
    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Lower Your Diabetes Risk

    Growing up in Mississippi, Herman L. Kemp, Jr. dined on fried chicken and biscuits for breakfast, sometimes with a side of macaroni and cheese. These eating habits continued into adulthood, where it wasn’t unusual for him to regularly splurge on a buffet-style breakfast, then hit another buffet for lunch or dinner.

    You can prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Here's how.
    By Joel Warner
  • Lower Your Diabetes Risk

    Growing up in Mississippi, Herman L. Kemp, Jr. dined on fried chicken and biscuits for breakfast, sometimes with a side of macaroni and cheese. These eating habits continued into adulthood, where it wasn’t unusual for him to regularly splurge on a buffet-style breakfast, then hit another buffet for lunch or dinner.

    You can prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. Here’s how.
    By Joel Warner
  • The Case for White Wine

    Anyone with a regular inclination for cabernet or Chianti must have breathed a booze-infused sigh of relief at some point over the past decade, as recent studies have shown that a moderate amount of red wine has major health benefits, including helping to protect the heart, thwart certain cancers, slow the effects of aging, and prevent neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease.

    Move over red, white is healthy, too.
    By Sarah Toland
  • Using Acupuncture to Balance Blood Sugar

    Editor's picture

    In my last post, I addressed Cynthia’s question about insomnia. It is interesting that she also asked about hypertension and anxiety. These are often all symptoms of a common problem—hypoglycemia—rather than separate illnesses.

  • Ask The Doctor: Type 2 Diabetes

    My 42-year-old brother, Gregg, just found out he has type 2 diabetes, and I’d like to help him get healthy. What can he doto avoid taking prescription drugs?

    Answered by Julian Witaker
  • Wheatberry Pancakes

    1 cup wheat berries (whole wheat kernels)
    1 tablespoon whole flaxseed
    2 cups water
    1/3 cup chickpea flour (besan) or low-fat soy flour
    1 tablespoon sugar
    2 teaspoons lemon juice
    1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    1/2 teaspoon salt

    Place the wheat berries, flaxseed, and water in a blender and process at high speed for about 2 minutes. Add the flour and process for 2 to 3 minutes or until very smooth. Add the sugar, lemon juice, baking powder, baking soda, and salt and process until well mixed.

    Heat a heavy nonstick griddle or skillet (a nonstick electric griddle cooks very evenly) over high heat until drops of water dance on the surface and then quickly disappear. Reduce the heat to medium-high. Working in batches if necessary, pour dollops of batter quickly onto the griddle, leaving space to expand. When bubbles appear on the surface, gently flip the pancakes. Don’t overcook; they should be a bit puffy when you take them off the griddle, so they are light and cakey.

    MAKES TWELVE 4” PANCAKES (3 SERVINGS)

    Per serving: 261 calories, 11 g protein, 53 g carbohydrates, 6 g sugar, 3 g total fat, 9% calories from fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 9 g fiber, 534 mg sodium

  • Bulgur Wheat and Quinoa Pilaf

    1 cup bulgur wheat
    1 cup quinoa
    1 large onion, chopped
    1 cup chopped celery
    1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
    1 teaspoon crushed dried rosemary or dried thyme or oregano
    Salt to taste

    Place the bulgur and quinoa in a dry, heavy skillet (such as cast-iron), stir-fry pan, or wok over high heat and cook, stirring constantly, until the grain smells toasty. Remove from the heat immediately and set aside.

    Steam-fry the onion and celery in a large nonstick saucepan with a tight lid until the onion begins to soften. Add the broth, bulgur, quinoa, parsley, and rosemary, thyme, or oregano. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to low and cook, uncovered, for 20 minutes. Let stand for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork and season with the salt.

  • Lemon and Artichoke Tagine (Moroccan Stew)

    2 tablespoons whole-wheat flour
    12 ounces low-fat chicken substitute strips, such as Yves Veggie Chicken Tenders,
    Lightlife Smart Menu Chik’n Strips, or Morningstar Farms Meal Starters Chik’n
    Strips
    1 large onion, sliced
    6 cloves garlic, chopped
    2 cups sliced mushrooms
    1 large green or red bell pepper, cored, seeded, and cut into chunks
    2 cups low-sodium vegetarian broth
    1 tablespoon group coriander
    1/2 tablespoon black pepper
    1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
    1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
    1/4 teaspoon paprika
    1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
    1 lemon, with peel, sliced and seeded
    1 jar (7 ounces) marinated artichoke heart quarters, rinsed under hot water and drained
    Salt to taste

    Place the flour in a shallow dish and roll the chicken substitute strips to coat. Place the strips in a large, heavy, deep nonstick skillet or stir-fry pan over medium-high heat and cook until browned. Remove from the pan and set aside.

    Add the onion and garlic to the skillet and steam-fry until soft, adding very small amounts of water as needed to prevent sticking and burning. (Or place in a microwaveable dish, cover, and microwave on high for 7 minutes.)

    Add the strips, mushrooms, bell pepper, broth, coriander, parsley, black pepper, tumeric, ginger, paprika, and red pepper. Place the lemon slices on top of the stew, cover reduce the heat, and simmer for 30 minutes.

    Remove and discard the lemon slices. Stir in the artichokes and cook just until heated. Season with salt and serve immediately.

    MAKES 4 SERVINGS

    Per serving: 165 calories, 20 g protein, 25 g carbohydrates, 3 g sugar, 1 g total fat, 3% calories from fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 10 g fiber, 584 mg sodium

  • Vegetarian “Refried” Beans

    4 1/2 cups cooked or 3 cans (15 ounces each) black, small red, kidney, or pinto beans, rinsed and drained.
    1 small onion, finely chopped
    2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon ground cumin
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 teaspoon dried garlic granules
    1 teaspoon chili powder
    Hot-pepper sauce to taste (optional)
    A few dashes of liquid smoke (optional)

    Place the beans, onion, vinegar, salt, cumin, oregano, garlic granules, chili powder, hot-pepper sauce, if desired, and liquid smoke, if desired, in a food processor. Blend for several minutes or until very smooth. Transfer to a serving bowl, cover, and refrigerate.

    For hot dip, microwave on high for about 3 minutes or heat in a skillet, stirring constantly.