depression

  • Spiced Nut and Seed Mix

    1 tablespoon melted butter
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 tablespoon agave nectar
    1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
    1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
    1/8 teaspoon cayenne
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cup walnuts
    1 cup almonds
    1/2 cup pumpkinseeds
    1/4 cup sunflower seeds
    2 tablespoons flaxseeds

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
    2. In a medium saucepan, combine butter, olive oil, agave, and spices. Cook on low heat for one minute. Add nuts and seeds; coat well.
    3. Spread in a single layer on baking sheet. Roast 5 minutes, or until nuts are golden.

    nutrition info: 203.4 calories; 17.7 g fat; 2.3 g saturated fat; 3.1 mg cholesterol; 5.9 g protein;
    8.5 g carbohydrates; 3.4 g fiber; 118.9 mg sodium

  • Warm Artichoke and Crab Dip

    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 red bell pepper, finely chopped
    3 medium garlic cloves, crushed
    1 15-ounce can artichoke hearts, chopped
    1 small Serrano chile, seeded and finely minced
    6 scallions, thinly sliced (include some green tops)
    1/2 cup Montrachet, or other creamy goat cheese
    1/2 pound jumbo lump crabmeat, picked over
    1/4 cup grated Asiago cheese
    1/4 cup finely chopped raw walnuts

    1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

    2. In a medium saucepan, heat olive oil and sauté red pepper and garlic until red pepper is tender. Remove from heat and stir in artichokes, Serrano chile, scallions, and goat cheese. Gently fold in crabmeat.

    3. Transfer to a lightly oiled baking dish. Sprinkle with grated Asiago and walnuts. Bake on middle rack about 20 minutes.

    4. Remove from oven and serve warm, with sliced whole-grain baguette or crackers.

    nutrition info per serving (6 to 8): 210.4 calories; 15.3 g fat; 4.8 g saturated fat; 21.1 mg cholesterol; 9.4 g protein; 10.6 g carbohydrates; 3.6 g fiber; 296.8 mg sodium

  • Chickpea and Red Pepper Salad With Lemon-Garlic Dressing

    1/2 cup silken tofu
    1/4 cup olive oil
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1 small garlic clove, pressed
    1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons
    fresh basil leaves, coarsely chopped
    4 cups mesclun mix
    4 cups arugula
    1 15-ounce can chickpeas
    1 small red pepper, cored and
    cut into thin strips
    1/2 small red onion, very thinly sliced
    1/2 cup black olives
    1/2 cup almonds
    Additional whole basil leaves for garnish

    1. To make dressing, combine tofu, olive oil and lemon juice in a blender, and puree until smooth and creamy. Add garlic and puree again for 5 seconds. Add 2 tablespoons of the basil leaves and pulse briefly to combine, leaving some visible pieces of basil. Set aside.
    2. In a medium salad bowl, combine mesclun mix, arugula, remaining basil, chickpeas, red pepper, and onion. Add just enough dressing to very lightly coat, and toss to mix. Divide salad among four individual plates and top each with olives and almonds. Garnish with additional basil leaves, if desired, and serve immediately.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 387 calories; 26.1 g fat; 2.9 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 11.7 g protein; 30.2 g carbohydrates; 7.8 g fiber; 433.8 mg sodium

  • Eat to Beat the Blues

    Ever wonder why you can’t resist the urge to overdo it on unhealthy foods when you’re feeling down? Turns out there’s a physiological reason we eat too much bread, ice cream, and other “comfort” foods when we’re depressed: The sugar and carbs they typically contain give us a mental and physical lift.

    36 foods to stave off— and cure—depression.
    By Lisa Turner
  • Shower the Blues Away

    A new study reports that taking a short, cool shower once or twice a day might be just as effective in treating mild depression as mood-enhancing drugs.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • Beat Golden-Year Blues

    In the last 20 years, the average life expectancy has increased 12 percent, but for our parents and grandparents living in nursing homes, a longer life may not mean a happier one. According to a recent study, one-third of nursing-home residents (median age of 82) suffer from depression. The good news: The fix may be as simple as supplementing with selenium.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • The Benzo Trap

    Teryn Taylor, of Marion, Indiana, has “benzo” voice: flat, devoid of emotion, almost robotic—the result of her unwitting dependence on anti-anxiety drugs (aka benzodiazepine tranquilizers). Taylor hardly looks the part.

    Anti-anxiety drugs ensnare millions of Americans in a web of addiction and pain. Before you fill that prescription, read on.
    By Matt Samet
  • Magnetic Personality

    Most types of magnet therapy sound like snake oil. A spam email, obscure website, or glowing advertisement promises that magnets will cure all your ailments, restore your youth, and do everything but your taxes. But not all of the magnet therapies are bogus. Take transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).

    A new type of magnet therapy may revolutionize how we treat depression.
    By Linda Childers
  • Breathe to Beat the Blues

    When my father took sick with depression, gravity seemed to claim him, body and soul. Everything sagged. I wish I’d known then about pranayama, yoga’s ancient treatment for the blues.

    Paranayama offers a drug-free solution to depression.
    By Stephanie Gold
  • Ask The Doctor: Lethargy and Diet

    Absolutely. In a nutshell, you want to feed your body, use it, and give it adequate rest. Before tackling the diet question, I want to make sure you’re getting enough exercise, fresh air, and plenty of sleep. On top of that, make time for those you love as well as yourself. Now, back to your diet. Here are several things to consider:

    I’m feeling lethargic and just not very happy. Could my diet be to blame?
    By Jacob Teitelbaum, MD