depression

  • No More SAD

    Every winter, thousands are affected by Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a depressive mood condition that sets in during the dark, winter months and lifts in the spring.

  • Nourishing Happiness

    Two months had passed since my daughter was born, and still I was walking around in a fog. I understand, based on comments from friends and family, that I radiated happiness during this time, but what I remember is struggling with sleeplessness and the constant demands of a newborn—my 8-pound bundle of joy had the clear upper hand.

    The yogic way to feed body and spirit
    By Melissa B. Williams
  • Lift Depression With Meditation

    With summer coming to a close and shorter, darker days ahead, you might be wondering how to cope with the negative thoughts that often accompany the season’s change and can lead to depression. A recent study found that age-old meditative techniques and more modern cognitive therapy can help alleviate symptoms.

    By Ziba Kashef
  • Your Brain On Brahmi

    Ayurveda has long advocated the use of Bacopa monnieri—known as Brahmi in Hindi and water hyssop in the West—to improve memory and boost cognitive performance. And a recent study from the National College of Natural Medicine in collaboration with researchers from Oregon Health and Science University, both in Portland, supports that claim.

    By Nora Simmons
  • Ask The Doctor: Seasional Affective Disorder

    It sounds like you have seasonal affective disorder (appropriately abbreviatedas “SAD”). The diagnosis requires that symptoms, which may include feelings of depression, hopelessness, loss of energy, anxiety, sleeplessness, difficulty concentrating, and carbohydrate cravings, be present for two winters.

    I can barely get out of bed on winter mornings. What’s wrong with me?
    By James S. Gordon, MD
  • Warm Artichoke and Crab Dip

    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 red bell pepper, finely chopped
    3 medium garlic cloves, crushed
    1 15-ounce can artichoke hearts, chopped
    1 small Serrano chile, seeded and finely minced
    6 scallions, thinly sliced (include some green tops)
    1/2 cup Montrachet, or other creamy goat cheese
    1/2 pound jumbo lump crabmeat, picked over
    1/4 cup grated Asiago cheese
    1/4 cup finely chopped raw walnuts

    1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

    2. In a medium saucepan, heat olive oil and sauté red pepper and garlic until red pepper is tender. Remove from heat and stir in artichokes, Serrano chile, scallions, and goat cheese. Gently fold in crabmeat.

    3. Transfer to a lightly oiled baking dish. Sprinkle with grated Asiago and walnuts. Bake on middle rack about 20 minutes.

    4. Remove from oven and serve warm, with sliced whole-grain baguette or crackers.

    nutrition info per serving (6 to 8): 210.4 calories; 15.3 g fat; 4.8 g saturated fat; 21.1 mg cholesterol; 9.4 g protein; 10.6 g carbohydrates; 3.6 g fiber; 296.8 mg sodium

  • Chickpea and Red Pepper Salad With Lemon-Garlic Dressing

    1/2 cup silken tofu
    1/4 cup olive oil
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1 small garlic clove, pressed
    1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons
    fresh basil leaves, coarsely chopped
    4 cups mesclun mix
    4 cups arugula
    1 15-ounce can chickpeas
    1 small red pepper, cored and
    cut into thin strips
    1/2 small red onion, very thinly sliced
    1/2 cup black olives
    1/2 cup almonds
    Additional whole basil leaves for garnish

    1. To make dressing, combine tofu, olive oil and lemon juice in a blender, and puree until smooth and creamy. Add garlic and puree again for 5 seconds. Add 2 tablespoons of the basil leaves and pulse briefly to combine, leaving some visible pieces of basil. Set aside.
    2. In a medium salad bowl, combine mesclun mix, arugula, remaining basil, chickpeas, red pepper, and onion. Add just enough dressing to very lightly coat, and toss to mix. Divide salad among four individual plates and top each with olives and almonds. Garnish with additional basil leaves, if desired, and serve immediately.

    nutrition info per serving (4): 387 calories; 26.1 g fat; 2.9 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 11.7 g protein; 30.2 g carbohydrates; 7.8 g fiber; 433.8 mg sodium

  • Spiced Nut and Seed Mix

    1 tablespoon melted butter
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 tablespoon agave nectar
    1 1/2 teaspoons cumin
    1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
    1/8 teaspoon cayenne
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cup walnuts
    1 cup almonds
    1/2 cup pumpkinseeds
    1/4 cup sunflower seeds
    2 tablespoons flaxseeds

    1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
    2. In a medium saucepan, combine butter, olive oil, agave, and spices. Cook on low heat for one minute. Add nuts and seeds; coat well.
    3. Spread in a single layer on baking sheet. Roast 5 minutes, or until nuts are golden.

    nutrition info: 203.4 calories; 17.7 g fat; 2.3 g saturated fat; 3.1 mg cholesterol; 5.9 g protein;
    8.5 g carbohydrates; 3.4 g fiber; 118.9 mg sodium

  • Shower the Blues Away

    A new study reports that taking a short, cool shower once or twice a day might be just as effective in treating mild depression as mood-enhancing drugs.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • Eat to Beat the Blues

    Ever wonder why you can’t resist the urge to overdo it on unhealthy foods when you’re feeling down? Turns out there’s a physiological reason we eat too much bread, ice cream, and other “comfort” foods when we’re depressed: The sugar and carbs they typically contain give us a mental and physical lift.

    36 foods to stave off— and cure—depression.
    By Lisa Turner