cholesterol

  • Go Nuts

    Turns out it might not be an apple a day that keeps the doc away: A new study in the Journal of Nutrition reports that eating a handful of nuts five or more times a week can reduce your risk of developing heart disease. Reach for almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts, and walnuts, says Sari Greaves, RD, a nutritionist in Bedminster, New Jersey.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Ask The Doctor: Elevated Cholesterol

    The short answer: Probably, but it depends on your HDL (good cholesterol) and triglyceride (the fat in your bloodstream) readings. Some doctors believe a high HDL (60 or more) cancels out the bad effects of a high LDL. However, researchers know an elevated LDL makes it harder for HDL to do its job.

  • A New Way to Lower Your Cholesterol

    Looking for a way to reduce your bad cholesterol but concerned about the side effects of statins, the drugs most often prescribed for that purpose? A recent study in Alternative Therapies offers further proof that the supplement Sytrinol, a combination of extracts from citrus fruits and palm oil, can achieve significant results in as little as four weeks.

    By James Keough
  • A Change of Heart

    Ever since the 1950s, when the Framingham Heart Study established a correlation between high cholesterol and heart attacks, doctors have focused on lowering cholesterol as a way to prevent heart disease. For years they’ve told us to accomplish this by eating a low-fat diet and exercising and, if that failed, by taking cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins.

    A new wave of doctors is relvolutionizing the way Western medicine prevents and treats heart disease. Here's what you need to know to keep your heart healthy for many beats to come.
    By James Keough
  • Taking Cholesterol to Heart

    The last time Bonnie went for her annual check-up her doctor warned her to watch her cholesterol. At 240, it hovered well above the normal 200-or-lower range, making her a likely candidate for a heart attack. Instead of filling the prescription he handed her for a cholesterol-lowering statin drug, however, Bonnie sought a second opinion and a more comprehensive blood test.

    By Dennis A. Goodman, MD, FACC
  • Return of the Good Egg

    For the longest time I would not eat an egg. My boycott started in third grade after I saw chicks hatching at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. I didn’t go so far as to rant about unborn chickens at the breakfast table, but I did give the evil eye to any family member who dared crack open an egg in front of me.

    By Anne Krueger
  • Spotlight on High Cholesterol

    On a routine visit to his doctor, Jerry Richardson*, a 54-year-old executive, got the unsettling news that his number was up: His total cholesterol level had soared to 280, well above the normal cutoff point of 199.

    What do almonds, tea, soybeans, and exercise have in common?
    By Christie Aschwanden