carrots

  • Raisin Collards and Carrots

    Serves 4

    Vegetables
    4 bunches collard greens, leaves removed and chopped
    4 carrots, grated

    Sauce
    1 medium cucumber
    1/2 cup raisins
    1/4 cup raw almond butter
    2 teaspoons Dr. Fuhrman's Riesling Raisin Vinegar (optional; available at drfuhrman.com)
    1 teaspoon nutritional yeast
    1/2 cup currants (optional)

    1. Steam collard greens for 15 minutes. Add grated carrots and steam another 5 minutes.

    2. Blend all sauce ingredients in a blender until smooth. Add sauce to collards and carrots, and toss. If desired, stir in currants. Serve warm.

    nutrition info per serving: 238 calories; 14 g fat; 8 g saturated fat; 86 mg cholesterol; 11 g protein; 19 g carbohydrates; 4 g fiber; 162 mg sodium

  • Dal with Winter Vegetables

    3 tablespoons ghee (clarified butter) or vegetable oil
    1 cup chopped carrots
    1 cup peeled and cubed
    butternut squash
    4 cups water
    1 tablespoon freshly
    grated ginger
    2 teaspoons turmeric
    2 teaspoons ground coriander
    1 teaspoon iodized salt (must be iodized on a sattvic diet)
    1 1/2 cups dried yellow lentils
    2 cups broccoli florets
    1 teaspoon brown
    mustard seed
    2 teaspoons cumin seed
    1 teaspoon fennel seed

    1. Add 2 tablespoons ghee (or oil), carrots, and squash to a large saucepan. Sauté for 8 minutes.
    2. Add water, ginger, turmeric, coriander, salt, and lentils. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for one hour.
    3. Add chopped broccoli and an additional cup of water (omit the water if you prefer a thick dal), and simmer for 10 minutes.
    4. While broccoli is cooking, toast brown mustard, cumin, and fennel in a skillet over high heat for 1 minute, or until spices become fragrant.
    5. Add remaining ghee or oil to the skillet, and sauté 1 minute. Combine with the broccoli and lentil mixture, and serve with basmati rice.

    nutrition info per serving: 158 calories; 7.8 g fat; 1.1 g saturated fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 6.2 g protein; 18.6 g carbohydrates; 7.1 g fiber; 417 mg sodium

  • Move Over, Crudite

    New research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that cooking some veggies boosts nutrient levels. The study, which compared broccoli, carrots, and zucchini, found that boiling, steaming, and even frying actually increases the levels of certain groups of antioxidants.

    By Scott Boulbol
  • Beet, Carrot, and Sesame Salad

    2 tablespoons sesame oil
    1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
    2 tablespoons honey
    2 tabelspoons black seasame seeds
    2 medium beets, grated
    2 medium carrots, grated
    Salt and white peper to taste

    In a small bowl, mix together sesame oil, toasted sesame oil, honey, and black sesame seeds. Grate two medium beets and two medium carrots; squeeze out moisture with paper towels. Combine with dressing, and season with salt and white pepper.