cancer

  • Wake-Up Call

    The jury is still out on whether there is a connection between cell phones and health problems. Here’s what we do know. And here’s how to be smarter about how you use your phone.

    The jury is still out on whether there is a connection between cell phones and health problems. Here's what we do know. And here's how to be smarter about how you use your phone.
    By Megan Feldman
  • Citrus Slices Cancer Risk

    ’Tis the season for citrus fruit. Good thing, because when eaten daily, those tasty grapefruits, clementines, and kumquats may lower incidence of several types of cancer, according to a new study of 42,470 Japanese adults over age 40. Among female participants, citrus consumption was tied to a 14 percent reduction of incidence of all cancers; for men it was 11 percent.

    by Melaina Juntti
  • The Red Meat-Cancer Connection

    Yet another study—this one including more than half a million people—confirms what our docs have been warning us about: Eating red meat increases cancer risk. So we can’t help but wonder, Why is red meat so bad? Recent research revealed at least part of the answer as chronic inflammation.

  • 8 Ways to Prevent Breast Cancer

    According to the American Cancer Society, one in eight US women will develop breast cancer at some point in their lives. This staggering stat could equal two members of your soccer team, three women in your yoga class, or five faces you see in a busy sushi joint. Fortunately, there are several natural ways to potentially lower your breast cancer risk.

    By Melaina Juntti
  • Ask The Doctor: Lymphedema

    Luckily, there are several ways to relieve the painful arm and leg swelling caused by secondary, or acquired, lymphedema. This condition, which affects an estimated 3 million cancer survivors, occurs when lymph nodes are damaged or removed during surgery or radiation treatment causing lymph fluid to accumulate in the tissues.

    Q. I’ve been suffering from lymphedema ever since my lumpectomy. What can I do to relieve the pain and swelling
  • How Low Can You Go?

    Nutritionists have known for a while now that watching your fat intake could prevent breast cancer; a new study now suggests such scrutiny may also prevent ovarian cancer. The Journal of the National Cancer Institute reported that postmenopausal women who trimmed their daily fat intake to 20 percent (instead of the average of 35 percent) reduced their risk by 40 percent in just four years.

    By Celia Shatzman
  • Build A Better Salad

    Want to boost brain health or eat to beat cancer? Make yourself a salad. Beth Reardon, RD, LDN, at Duke Integrative Medicine, helps you customize your greens.

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Better Berries to Fight Cancer

    The next time you toss a handful of berries into your morning smoothie, reach for freeze-dried instead of fresh or frozen. Science now indicates that freeze-dried berries, specifically black raspberries, inhibit cancer development by restoring hundreds of cancer-altered genes to their normal state.

    By Lindsay Wilson
  • Lung Cancer: Should You Worry?

    The first question most of us ask when someone gets lung cancer is: How much did she smoke? Unfortunately anyone can get the disease without ever lighting up. In fact, about 13 percent of those diagnosed with lung cancer are nonsmokers, according to the American Cancer Society.

    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Vitamin D Does a Body Good

    Cancer: Research suggests that getting enough vitamin D may help regulate cellular growth, potentially preventing cells from becoming cancerous.

    Chronic pain: Vitamin D deficiency is increasingly recognized as a cause of muscle pain and weakness.

    By Meghan Rabbitt