berries

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  • Triple Berry Cobbler

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]
    Makes: 12 giant or 24 party servings

    About 2 2/3 cups blueberries

    About 2 2/3 cup raspberries

    About 2 1/2 cups marionberries

    1 1/4 cups sugar

    1/4 cup cornstarch

    1/4 cup lemon juice

    Topping

    1 cup butter, room temperature

    1 cup sugar

    2 tablespoons vanilla extract

    2/3 cup cornmeal

    2/3 cup tapioca starch

    1/3 cup potato starch

    1/3 cup rice flour

    1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder

    1 teaspoon salt

    1 teaspoon cinnamon

    1/2 teaspoon cardamom

    1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum

    1 cup milk

    2 tablespoons coarse sanding sugar or granulated sugar, for topping

    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. In a large bowl, toss together the blueberries, raspberries, marionberries, sugar, cornstarch, and lemon juice to evenly coat the berries. Pour into a 9x13-inch baking pan. To make the topping, cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Blend in the vanilla. In a separate bowl, combine the cornmeal, starches, rice flour, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, cardamom, and xanthan gum. Add the dry ingredients to the butter mixture in three additions, alternating with the milk. Pour the topping over the berry filling. Sprinkle the sanding sugar evenly over the topping and bake until the topping is cooked through, a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, and the berry filling is hot and bubbly, 65 to 70 minutes. Serve hot or cold. Source: Sweet Cravings by Kyra Bussanich, image by Leela Cyd

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