baking

  • Easy and Gluten-free

    Sourdough has a unique flavor that stems from the preparation of its leavener. Rather than tearing open a packet of commercially cultured yeast to provide a quick burst of CO2, sourdough relies on protracted fermentation to give the bread lift while at the same time creating its unique (sour) flavor profiles.

    A sourdough loaf worth the effort
    By Craig Gustafson
  • Glazed Baked Doughnuts

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    Makes: 8

    1 cup gluten-free all-purpose flour with xanthan gum in mix

    1/2 cup sugar

    1/4 cup dried buttermilk powder

    4 teaspoons dried egg whites

    1 teaspoon baking powder

    1/2 teaspoon baking soda

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    2 eggs

    1/4 cup canola oil, melted butter, or nondairy alternative

    2 tablespoons water

    1 tablespoon vanilla extract

    Chocolate glaze (recipe follows)

     

    Chocolate glaze

    1 cup confectioners’ sugar

    1 teaspoon vanilla extract

    2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

    Pinch of salt

    1 tablespoon milk (regular or lactose-free) or nondairy alternative (almond, rice, soy), plus more as needed

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Spray a nonstick doughnut pan with nonstick cooking spray. Also spray the inside of a one-gallon self-sealing plastic bag well with nonstick cooking spray. Cut a 3/4-inch diagonal off one corner. (If the corner is cut too large, the doughnut yield will be less.) In a two-quart bowl, place the flour, sugar, buttermilk powder, dried egg whites, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Whisk to mix well. In a separate two-quart bowl, place the eggs, oil or butter, water, and vanilla extract. Beat well with a handheld mixer. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix to combine with a silicone spatula. Let the batter rest for five minutes.

    Scrape the batter into the plastic bag, squeeze out the air, and seal. Push the batter toward the cut corner of the bag and, twisting the bag, pipe the batter into the doughnut pan, making a complete round (standard pans hold six doughnuts.) Bake for 10 minutes or until the doughnuts are brown on top and cooked through. Remove from the oven. Flip the doughnuts onto a cooling rack, then turn right side up. Place the cooling rack on a baking sheet or parchment paper to make cleanup easier when icing. Repeat with the remaining doughnut batter. Brush the doughnuts with the glaze while they are still warm. If using sprinkles, add now. Let the glaze dry until the doughnuts are completely cool. Wrap loosely and serve within two days, or wrap and freeze.

    To make chocolate glaze, place the sugar in a small bowl. Add the vanilla extract, cocoa, salt, and the one tablespoon milk; stir well. Add more milk only as needed. The glaze needs to be thin enough to spread with a pastry brush but thick enough to stick on the warm doughnuts. Source: Cooking for Your Gluten-Free Teen by Carlyn Berghoff, Sarah Berghoff McClure, Dr. Suzanne P. Nelson, and Nancy Ross Ryan

  • Gluten-free Strawberry-walnut Scones

    Weekly Recipe: 
    NonWeekly
    [title]

    2 cups raw walnuts

    ¼ cup coconut flour, sifted

    1 teaspoon cinnamon

    1 teaspoon baking soda

    ½ teaspoon sea salt

    ¼ cup pure maple syrup

    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

    2 eggs

    ¼ cup Rich and Creamy Melt, softened until pourable

    Organic strawberry jam

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place the walnuts in a food processor and pulse until a fine meal is formed. Place the walnut meal and the remaining dry ingredients in a medium bowl and whisk to combine. Add the wet ingredients, except the Melt Organic, to the walnut meal mixture. Blend well with a hand mixer. With the mixer on low, slowly pour in the Melt Organic. Mix well. Using an ice cream size scoop, make eight even balls of dough and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. With your thumb or a teaspoon, make deep well in the center of each scone. Fill each well with one teaspoon strawberry jam. Bake 23-25 minutes or until tops are golden brown and the dough springs back when pressed lightly. Cool on pan for five minutes, then transfer to wire racks to cool completely. Store leftovers in an airtight container up to three days or freeze up to three months. Source: Melt Chef Cygnia Rapp; meltbutteryspread.com

  • Gluten-Free Baking Basics

    Back in 1997 when next to nobody had heard of the term “gluten free,” I found myself sick—so sick that I couldn’t get out of bed. Sure, I’d experienced the telltale fatigue, migraines, and anemia for years, but with the additional onset of serious gastrointestinal symptoms, my situation had become unbearable.

    Expert help for how to make gluten-free, holiday treats taste good.
    By Elana Amsterdam