allergies

  • Kitty Litter: Make the Natural Choice

    Clumping cat litters use sodium bentonite—when wet, it expands to about 15 times its size and hardens like cement. Ingesting clumping litter has been linked to deadly intestinal blockages and pulmonary problems in cats, and to pulmonary problems in humans.

    By Carole Howell
  • Structural Pasteurization

    It turns out you just may be allergic to the building you’re in. Moisture damage from rain, plumbing leaks, sewage spills, and even humidity can cause unseen growth of mold, fungi, bacteria, and viruses. Other dangers that can lurk within a structure include chemical odors, tiny dust mites, insects, and rodents that could serve as vectors for disease.

    Is your home, place of work, or even your gym making you sick?
  • Wash, Wash, Wash Your Nose

    Do you have tissues in every room of your house? Do you hesitate to go outside on some days because you know your allergies are going to make you suffer? I do. I’ve often thought that Mother Nature’s sense of humor has a cruel streak, giving me both a passion for the outdoors and allergies to all the trees, flowers, grasses, and animals I love. Not fair!

    A drug-free way to clear up your allergies
    By Hana R. Solomon, MD
  • Herbs, Vitamin C, and Folate-Rich Foods Help Fight Spring Allergies

    Editor's picture

    Spring allergies cause a host of symptoms that can range from mild to severe.  Many resort to taking prescription or over-the-counter drugs such as antihistamines and steroids, which may not be completely safe or without side effects.  A healthy alternative is t

  • Humid Inside?

     

    Did you know that the recommended relative humidity for your home is between 30 and 50 percent? This not only affects your comfort, but your health and your wallet, as well.

  • Relieve Allergies Naturally

    Treat the cause of your sensitivities and kick the antihistamine habit!
  • So Long, Seasonal Allergies

    A few months ago, actress Michelle Rodriguez—the gutsy pilot in Avatar and heroine in the TV show Lost—appeared on The Jay Leno Show. “You filmed Lost in Hawaii,” said Leno. “What was the hardest thing about living in Hawaii?”

    Silence hay fever's sneezing, wheezing, and sniffles with homeopathy.
    By Kristin Bjornsen
  • Achoo Alert

    Do fresh-picked peaches make you sneeze? Does chomping on celery tickle your tongue? Studies show that if you’re allergic to seasonal pollens, your immune system may mistake the proteins of certain raw fruits and veggies for those in pollen—causing you to wheeze, itch, or swell.

    By Melaina Juntti
  • Allergy Test

    Every spring for as long as Julie Daly can remember, seasonal allergies would leave her with chronic sinus pain, postnasal drip, and debilitating headaches.

    Do you know what’s causing your runny nose and watery eyes? Hint: It’s not only the pollen count. These five surprising triggers could be making your sniffle season worse. Here’s how to outsmart them.
    By Karen Asp
  • Ragweed Relief

    August marks the unofficial start of ragweed season. If you’re one of the 36 million Americans who suffer from this evil cousin of the sunflower, steer clear of bananas, cucumbers, melons, and zucchinis, says Clifford W. Bassett, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine and otolaryngology at Long Island College Hospital in New York.

    By Nicole Duncan