From Wedding Woes to Bridal Bliss: Three Tips to Tame an Inner Bridezilla

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The wedding planning process is stressful. From family dynamics and finances, to working with vendors, gown fittings and menu tastings, the obstacles on the way to the altar are seemingly endless. 

The notion that the "big day" is the most important day in a couple's life creates immense pressure. Everyone wants to have a perfect wedding, but this expectation is nearly impossible to achieve and can leave the bride-to-be feeling frazzled.

Dr. Deborah Pardee, licensed psychologist and core faculty at University of the Rockies, a graduate school that specializes in social and behavioral sciences, offers the following tips to tame your inner bridezilla, ease stress, and make it a day to remember (for the right reasons):

Great Expectations.
You've thought about this day for years and you may have an idea in mind of what your wedding looks like. Unfortunately, you're not the only one. Your parents, in-laws, and friends also have their own ideas of what the day should entail. They will most likely offer unsolicited advice regarding details and decisions surrounding your special day.

Manage expectations. Be clear about the wedding you want and stay true to your vision. Trying to make everyone else happy will only take away from the joy of being a bride.

Nothing is Flawless.
Brides often have difficulty releasing control in the planning process for fear of something not being perfect, which can increase anxiety as the wedding date gets closer. Brides especially experience a lot of pressure because they are more invested in the process, typically have more responsibilities, and are considered the focal point of the wedding.

Decor, dress fittings, menu options, the guest list, and seating arrangements – the tasks are endless. Make a to-do list and ask for help when needed. Weddings don't have to be stressful and dramatic and, more often than not, something will go wrong along the way. You can't control everything. The most important thing is that you are marrying the person you love.

All in the Family.
As if you didn't have enough to worry about with your own family getting along, now you are introducing a new group of people into the mix. The bride's and groom's families may not like one another, may not approve of the marriage, or may have conflict about the cost of the wedding. At a time of celebration, these tensions can be overwhelming.

Be sure to talk to your family members individually about the importance of the day. Transitioning into one big family can be a challenging process, so don't force it. Regardless of culture clashes and family dynamics, remember that the marriage is between you and your spouse, and not your family.