Waiting at the Airport? Take a Minute to Learn How to Save Someone’s Life with Hands-Only CPR

Waiting for a flight at the airport? Why not put that time to good use and learn how to save someone’s life?

The American Heart Association and American Airlines Occupation Health Services are helping passengers learn and practice lifesaving Hands-Only™ CPR while waiting for flights at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

The Hands-Only CPR kiosk will be placed in Terminal C, Gate 7 for six months, allowing hands-on practice with an actual CPR manikin and automated watch-while-practice CPR program.

“Every American should know the simple steps of hands-only CPR,” said Ahamed Idris, MD, a spokesman for the American Heart Association and professor of Surgery and Internal Medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. “We hope the Hands-Only CPR kiosk at DFW Airport really takes off: we’d love to see other high-traffic places do the same so more people can learn this lifesaving skill.”

The American Heart Association has simplified the steps of CPR to encourage more people to take action: If you see a teen or adult collapse, first call 911, then push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of the Bee Gees’ song “Stayin’ Alive,” which has the perfect beat for proper CPR. With hands-only CPR, you don’t have to do rescue breaths—just keep pushing until emergency help arrives.

The DFW touch screen kiosk’s video program gives a brief introduction to the steps of Hands-Only CPR, followed by a practice session and a 30-second CPR test. The kiosk provides feedback about the depth, and rate of your compressions and proper hand placement.

“We care about the safety of our customers,” said Jeral Ahtone, MD, area medical director with American Airlines Occupational Health Services. “The more lifesavers we have at the airport, the better off we all are. It takes just a few minutes, and you never know when or where you might need to save a life.”

For more information about Hands-Only CPR, visit http://www.heart.org/handsonlycpr.