Only 29% of People With Diabetes Report That Their Doctors Ask Them for Input for Their Own Treatment Plans

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Results from the global Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs 2 study (DAWN2™) presented today at a symposium during the World Diabetes Congress of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), show that only 29% of people with diabetes report that their healthcare team ask for their input when making their treatment plans. Furthermore, only 33% said they were encouraged by their healthcare professional to ask questions in the consultation.

These results are surprising, given the importance of active involvement of people with diabetes in their own treatment and care. In fact, 84% of healthcare professionals who took part in the study said it would be helpful if their patients prepared questions in advance of the consultation.

“People with diabetes who feel supported and capable of self-managing their condition are more likely to have a successful treatment outcome and therefore have the opportunity to live a better life with diabetes,” explained Ingrid Willaing, head of education research at the Steno Diabetes Center and lead national investigator for DAWN2™ in Denmark, during her symposium presentation. “The DAWN2™ study highlights that far too few people with diabetes are supported to take an active role.”

To help break down communication barriers and misconceptions about diabetes treatments and thereby improve effective self-management of type 2 diabetes, a theatre play called “Getting Straight to the Point” was held at the congress on December 4th. Here, a panel of leading diabetes experts called for both healthcare professionals and people with type 2 diabetes to create opportunities for open dialogue, shared decision-making and active engagement for better physical and emotional outcomes.

A series of other global DAWN2™ results were announced during the congress highlighting the insufficiencies relating to quality of life with diabetes, support for families, access to diabetes education and psychosocial support, positive awareness of diabetes in society, and attention to the special needs of vulnerable populations with diabetes.

“The DAWN2™ study calls for united efforts across stakeholders and nations to advance a person-centered approach to improve prevention, care, education, and support for people with diabetes and their families,” says Sir Michael Hirst, president of the International Diabetes Federation.

DAWN2™ represents the voices of more than 15,000 people with diabetes, their family members, and healthcare professionals in 17 countries across 4 continents.