Leading Cardiologist Urges Informed Choices

 

Leading cardiologist, Dr. Carl Lavie, Medical Director, Cardiac Rehabilitation and Prevention at the John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, New Orleans, LA, urges people seeking dietary supplement niacin to make informed choices when adding one to their daily health routine because some of them have not been clinically proven to support good cholesterol. 

"Cardiologists like me have been recommending dietary supplement Slo-Niacin for over two decades because it contains nicotinic acid, the form of dietary supplement niacin that is clinically proven to support good cholesterol," said Dr. Lavie.  "Dietary supplement niacins touted as 'flush-free' may sound more appealing for obvious reasons, but the fact is, they are not clinically proven to support good cholesterol, which is enough to make the educated consumer red in the face with anger, especially if they are taking one every day," added Dr. Lavie.

Although not all people experience flushing when taking niacin, it may occur with the use of nicotinic acid, which causes temporary vasodilation or widening of the blood vessels in the skin. Flushing symptoms are typically most intense with immediate-release nicotinic acid. Slo-Niacin's unique polygel controlled-release system gradually delivers nicotinic acid to the body and is designed to reduce the likelihood of flushing.

"Consumers need to read the label and look for nicotinic acid if they want a form of niacin that is clinically proven to support good cholesterol," said Dr. Lavie.  "The fact is that 'flush-free' dietary supplement niacins containing inositol hexaniacinate, inositol hexanicotinate, or nicotinamide, all have complex, scientific-sounding names but are simply not clinically proven to support good cholesterol, so examine the label carefully," added Dr. Lavie.