Hydroxycut Offers Healthy Advice Amidst Weight Loss Controversy

Leading weight loss supplement brand, Hydroxycut, offers further insight into new findings.
[title]

Since the late 19th century, many dieticians and health professionals have felt that "a calorie is a calorie"; when people consume more calories than they expend – they become overweight. However, a recent article from The New York Times takes this viewpoint in a new direction following the results of a new study. The study, conducted by Dr. David Ludwig of Boston Children's Hospital, observed weight loss patterns among participants who took part in three different diets. Hydroxycut, producer of the best-selling weight loss supplement in the country, took notice of this controversial study and suggests additional ways for people to improve diet.

Dr. Ludwig and his collaborators began the clinical trial with hopes to find out if being overweight was really a direct result of caloric intake and relevant expenditure or something more complicated.  To observe these trends, researchers first semi-starved subjects until they lost 15 percent of their initial body weight. After that was accomplished, they were only allowed to eat a restricted diet based on the amount of calories they expended.

However, The NY Times notes that the most intriguing and revealing part of the study came from the three diets Ludwig used to observe caloric/weight loss differences. Over a course of three months the subjects were supplied their calories in the form of low-fat/high-carb foods, foods with a low glycemic index and lastly foods that were low-carb/high-fat.

The makers of Hydroxycut took note of Ludwig's study, as they believe a properly-balanced diet is key to weight loss. However, as this recent study makes clear, it has yet to be discovered what is exactly a "proper diet" is; the subject is often debated, but one thing is for certain for the makers of Hydroxycut – science will continue to study the fundamental question of how we should best eat to lose weight. In a recent press statement, the company notes, "making healthy substitutions for certain foods can also make sure that you are eating calories from more nutritious sources."

Ludwig's results may provide more insight into what makes up a "proper diet." The low-carbohydrate diet was the most effective at helping individuals burn more calories, and the carbohydrate-rich diet had the worst effect on the body's ability to burn calories.

While these results are controversial and require further research, it is clear that calories alone do not necessarily hold as much impact on weight gain as previously expected. For those seeking to make more healthy decisions of where their calories come from, Hydroxycut offers a comprehensive list of substitutions on its website.