Gluten-Free Advocate Elisabeth Hasselbeck Joins GlutenFreely.com

Hasselbeck to contribute gluten-free tips and recipes for the online resource
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GlutenFreely.com, the online store and gluten-free lifestyle resource, is proud to welcome Daytime Emmy Award winner and author Elisabeth Hasselbeck, a dedicated advocate for gluten-free nutrition, to the site as its newest partner and contributor. Hasselbeck, a celiac, will offer tips on how to maintain a gluten-free lifestyle through a new video series called “The Joy of Gluten-Free,” blog posts, and a roster of gluten-free recipes from her second book, “Deliciously G-Free.”

Since her celiac disease diagnosis, Hasselbeck has committed herself to raising awareness about the autoimmune disease, and works closely with the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University. Elisabeth has written two New York Times best sellers; in 2009 “The G-Free Diet: A Gluten-Free Survival Guide” and in 2012 “Deliciously G-Free” where gluten-free recipes were made fun and easy. In 2011, she created her own line of gluten-free snack and protein bars under the brand nogii, and she has helped raise awareness on the topic through appearances on national talk shows.“Our mission is to make GlutenFreely.com a dynamic and useful resource for the gluten-free community through great food products, lifestyle tips, new recipes and the latest information about living gluten-free,” said Rebecca Thompson, Marketing Manager for GlutenFreely.com at General Mills. “We’re thrilled to partner with Elisabeth and excited to share her own gluten-free journey and advice on an ongoing basis.”

During September, visitors to the website can view the first installment of her “Joy of Gluten-Free” video series on the subject of “Getting Started” and how to create a gluten-free kitchen in your home. Her debut blog post on the site focuses on advice for being prepared to send a gluten-free child off to school for the first time.

“I know first-hand that a celiac diagnosis can seem overwhelming, given all the lifestyle changes you need to make to feel good,” said Hasselbeck. “It’s so important to make sure you have enough information and resources, like GlutenFreely.com at your fingertips, so you can enjoy all the things you want to – like cooking, dining out and traveling, but remain gluten-free.”

About three million Americans are affected by celiac disease, an inherited autoimmune disorder that is triggered by the consumption of gluten – a protein found in wheat, barley, rye and some oats. While celiac disease affects about 1 percent of the US population, experts also believe there is a separate portion of the population – roughly 6 percent – that has a related and poorly understood condition known as gluten sensitivity.

To see Hasselbeck’s new videos and blog posts, and get more information on living a gluten-free life, visit GlutenFreely.com.