Death of Monkees Singer Davy Jones at the Age of 66 Stresses the Importance of Cardiovascular Health

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Healthy Lifestyle and Preventive Health Assessments Can Reduce the Risk of Heart Attack

Davy Jones may be best remembered as the lead singer of the first tailor made TV band, The Monkees. But, his recent death from an apparent heart attack at the young age of 66 can also serve to remind not only his fans, but everyone of the importance of cardiovascular health.

 

According to the American Heart Association, sixty percent of individuals who suffer a heart attack have no symptoms of heart trouble prior to the attack. HealthFair (healthfair.com), the nation’s leading provider of mobile health screening services suggests that heart attack can often be avoided with healthy lifestyle choices and preventive health screenings.

 

“A simple HealthFair screening diagnosed my mitral valve prolapse and regurgitation,” said Melody Messer of Georgia. “Within a few months I had surgery to repair the problem. Otherwise I would have had congestive heart failure. The HealthFair screening was worth every penny.”

 

Heart disease – also called cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease – is a simple term used to describe several problems related to plaque buildup in the walls of the arteries, or atherosclerosis. As the plaque builds up, the arteries narrow, making it more difficult for blood to flow and creating a risk for heart attack or stroke. 

 

“Heart disease, including stroke, is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States,” said HealthFair Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Robert Oristaglio, DO. “Atherosclerosis doesn’t happen overnight. It starts in childhood and progresses over decades.”

 

Although family history and genetics can play a part, heart disease can be the result of poor lifestyle choices, such as poor diet, lack of exercise and smoking. The heart, like any other muscle, needs proper exercise. Doctors say many people can avoid heart disease by eating a healthy, balanced diet, getting enough exercise and rest and avoiding smoking and alcohol. “Anyone wondering if they’re at risk should contact HealthFair at 1.888.822.3247 to find a mobile health screening event nearby to test their heart health,” added Oristaglio.

 

HealthFair partners with hospital systems across Florida, Oklahoma, Chicago, Indiana, Phoenix, Virginia, Kansas City, Texas and Philadelphia to bring these mobile health screenings to communities across the country.