Kids Health

  • TV Ups Kids' BP

    The school bully may not be the only reason Junior’s blood is boiling. New research from Michigan State University shows that children who watch protracted amounts of TV have higher blood pressure than those who don’t, regardless of individual body weight.

    By Sarah Toland
  • Secrets of Healthy Kids

    POP QUIZ: Besides homework and art projects, what’s your kid likely to bring home during the first few weeks of school? That’s right, a cold. But it’s not just exposure to the germs of hundreds of other children that’ll keep her bed-bound. Creeping stress levels and poor eating habits also are to blame.

    Turns out it takes more than an apple a day to keep your little ones out of the doctor’s office. Here’s what you need to make this fall their healthiest yet.
    By Melody Warnick
  • Back in Focus

    To Susan Williams of Charlotte, North Carolina, it was like a speed bump she couldn’t get past. That’s how she described the wall she would hit when work deadlines loomed and her focus pinballed from one subject to the next. “Sometimes I was so easily distracted, the simplest task seemed daunting,” says Williams, 60.

    19 ways to manage ADHD without drugs
    By Matthew Solan
  • Secrets of Healthy Kids

    POP QUIZ: Besides homework and art projects, what’s your kid likely to bring home during the first few weeks of school? That’s right, a cold. But it’s not just exposure to the germs of hundreds of other children that’ll keep her bed-bound. Creeping stress levels and poor eating habits also are to blame.

    Turns out it takes more than an apple a day to keep your little ones out of the doctor’s office. Here’s what you need to make this fall their healthiest yet.
    By Melody Warnick
  • What's My Alternative: Precription Drugs for ADHD

    Josh Goulding was diagnosed with attention deficit–hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in second grade, after his impulsive and disruptive behavior frequently landed him in the school principal’s office. “Over several years, I was put on a whole gamut of drugs, and nothing worked well,” says Goulding, now 24.

    By Diana Reynolds Roome
  • Create an Eco-Chic Nursery

    Pick the right paint
    Choose paint with low or no VOCs (volatile organic compounds) to protect your baby from breathing in these harmful chemicals, which are commonly found in regular paint. If you opt for a low-VOC paint, choose one with a VOC level of less than 10 mg per liter.

    Know your flooring

    From toys to cribs, harmful toxins lurk in some of the most popular products for children. Here’s what you need to know to keep your baby safe.
    By Jodi Helmer
  • Calm Junior's Jitters

    That small space between your kids’ eyebrows may save them—and you—from some high-stress freak-outs. A recent study by UC Irvine anesthesiologists with collaboration from Yale doctors found that applying pressure there (it’s called the Extra-1 acupoint) lowered presurgery anxiety enough to reduce the amount of sedative needed prior to going under the knife.

    By Jessica Downey
  • No Child Left Bananas

    Just like adults, children can feel completely out of control when they get stressed. Teaching them, by example, to stay present, quiet their minds, and check in with their gut feelings will help them learn to contain their emotions safely so temper tantrums don’t become their default mode of expression.

    By Elizabeth Marglin
  • Focus On Food: Children's Nutrition

    Through his work as an associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, William Sears, MD, has found that as many as 50 percent of the kids who get diagnosed with ADD or ADHD also have poor nutrition. Sears believes they actually suffer from what he calls Nutrition Deficiency Disorder (NDD).

    By Nora Simmons
  • Pretty in Pink?

    Lipstick, eyeliner, mascara, perfume—Jessica Assaf applied them all, and more, before she hit 12. And by her mid teens, she estimates she was using 15 to 20 beauty products a day. Like many girls, Assaf was indoctrinated into the beauty culture at a young age, with makeover-themed birthday parties as early as kindergarten and trips to the nail salon starting in grade school.

    Companies now market makeup to girls as young as 3—and the health implications are huge.
    By Stacy Malkan