Health

  • What's My Alternative: Back Injuries

    While 14-year-old Emily Bowman of Colleyville, Texas, was doing sprints during soccer practice, she bent down to touch the field and turn around—and when she couldn’t stand up again, she knew she’d hurt herself badly.

    By Meghan Rabbitt
  • Green Clean Fun

    Call me crazy, but I love cleaning. Not in an obsessive, Monica-from-Friends kind of way, but I love that feeling of satisfaction I get after a good scrub session. A wave of bliss washes over me as I sink into the couch and survey the fruits of my labor—a spotless house.

    Here's the dirt behind your favorite cleaning prodcuts and alternatives that are better for your health and the environment. The best part? They work. Really!
    By Nicole Duncan
  • Look Before You Hop

    Including a real bunny in your child’s Easter basket may seem like a great gift idea. But each year, far too many bunnies end up in animal shelters when families realize that little Peter Cottontail is pretty high maintenance. According to the House Rabbit Society, a national nonprofit rescue and education group, rabbits are not ideal pets for children.

    by O'Rya Hyde-Keller
  • ASk The Doctor: Mercury Exposure

    You bring up an excellent question, and I hear it at my clinic almost weekly. Your experience at the doctor’s office mirrors the typical approach to heavy-metal testing—if the physician tests you at all.

    My family doctor tested my blood for heavy-metal poisoning and told me he saw no sign of lead or mercury. I’ve since heard that the test he used may not be very accurate. Should I get retested?
    By Paul S. Anderson, ND
  • Ask The Doctor: Rheumatoid Arthritis and Iritis

    Iritis is an inflammatory eye disorder that’s not caused by a viral or bacterial infection, and unfortunately, it’s one of the most dangerous kinds of “red eye” conditions you can have. A more common type, conjunctivitis (also called pink eye), is caused by either bacteria or viruses.

    I have rheumatoid arthritis, and my doctor warned me to get checked for iritis. First, what is it, and second, is it dangerous?
    By Paul S. Anderson, ND
  • Grass Eating Pooches

    Finding your pooch grazing in the backyard like a Jersey cow isn’t always bad and actually quite normal, explains veterinarian Randy Caviness, DVM, of the Integrative Animal Health Center in Bolton, Massachusetts. “Dogs eat grass because it acts as a natural antacid and is usually soothing for the stomach,” Caviness says.

    My dog Charlie eats grass to make himself throw up. Is this healthy? What can I do?
  • Calm Restless Legs

    The English physician who first described restless legs syndrome (RLS) in 1683 wrote of “leapings and contractions of the tendons” so intense his patients were “no more able to sleep than if they were in a place of greatest torture.” Yet throughout the 1800s, RLS sufferers who complained of its hallmark “creepy crawly” or “itchy, burning” sensatio

    Get a step ahead of this common condition.
    By Lisa Marshall
  • Healing Houseplants

    Sprucing up your home or office with a touch of Mother Nature can do more than just brighten the space. These three plants can also do wonders for your body and mind, says Shelley Torgrove, certified clinical herbalist in Denver:

    Rosemary ... for mental clarity and memory

    By Nicole Duncan
  • Ask The Doctor: Mercury Exposure

    You bring up an excellent question, and I hear it at my clinic almost weekly. Your experience at the doctor’s office mirrors the typical approach to heavy-metal testing—if the physician tests you at all.

    My family doctor tested my blood for heavy-metal poisoning and told me he saw no sign of lead or mercury. I’ve since heard that the test he used may not be very accurate. Should I get retested?
    By Paul S. Anderson, ND
  • Take a Bite Out of Plaque

    Does your dog’s breath make you cringe every time he comes in for a cuddle? Love those big, sloppy kisses—but need to wash your face immediately after? Just because bad breath is common in dogs doesn’t mean it’s normal, says Larry Bernstein, VMD, a holistic veterinarian in North Miami Beach, Florida, and president of the Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy.

    Eighty percent of dogs have some form of dental disease by the time they’re 3. But proper care can turn your pet’s mouth—and health—around.