Health

  • A New Cure for Bad Breath

    Research shows that magnolia-bark extract, a traditional Chinese medicine historically used for stress relief, also helps halt halitosis. Mints and gum containing magnolia bark kill about 60 percent of the bad breath-causing bacteria, compared to the 4 percent killed by standard mints, according to a recent study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

    By Kris Kucera
  • The Beauty Bar: Vitamin A's Sun-Saving Power

    New research shows it might be time to toss a bottle of vitamin A into your beach bag along with the sunscreen. In a recent study, patients taking 50,000 IU of vitamin A a day for a year saw an 80 percent improvement in previously sun-damaged skin. Some scientists believe this occurred because UVA and UVB light attacks the vitamin A naturally present on the skin’s surface.

    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Help For Those With Gas

    Certain foods have been shown to instigate this annoying—and often embarrassing—problem. “Microbes in the digestive tract feed on the carbohydrates we consume,” says Gerard Mullin, MD, director of Integrative GI Nutrition Services at Johns Hopkins Hospital. “Those bacteria act like a little brewery in our gut, metabolizing sugars.

    By Lindsey Galloway
  • Real Men Moisturize

    The world of men’s skincare has come a long way from a can of shaving cream, a splash of aftershave, and a trusty bar of soap. Even so, few guys would put man and moisturizer in the same sentence. Sure, men’s and women’s skin is different. Male skin is oilier, sweatier, and 20 percent thicker. But the belief that men’s skin is somehow more resilient than women’s?

    Simply skincare tips fom X to Y
  • Ask The Doctor: Iron for Infants

    Not at all. Iron plays a vital role in your baby’s health by helping make hemoglobin, a complex protein that ferries oxygen around the body. Low levels of iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia, which can cause developmental problems.

    I’m worried about whether my infant gets enough iron. Am I just being paranoid?
    By Roy Steinbock, MD
  • Is Your Water on Drugs?

    The ancient mariner’s lament gained new relevance recently when a five-month Associated Press investigation revealed traces of pharmaceuticals in the drinking water supplies of 41 million Americans.

    By Lisa Marshall
  • In Search of the Safest Sippy

    As concern about toxic chemicals leaching from plastic baby products mounts, parents are examining everything that goes into the mouths of their babes. The reason for alarm: a recent report suggesting that significant (read dangerous) levels of bisphenol-A (BPA) can be found not only in baby bottles, but many other beverage containers.

  • 1,4 Dioxanes May Be Lurking in Organic Bodycare

    Just because a skincare product calls itself organic doesn’t necessarily make it free of petrochemical by-products.

    By Elizabeth Marglin
  • Yoga Rx: Endometriosis

    The severe pain and heavy bleeding associated with endometriosis impacts nearly 5 million US women. While there’s no cure, yoga can help manage pain. Try these poses from Yoga for a Healthy Menstrual Cycle by Linda Sparrowe (Natural Solutions’ editor-in-chief) and Patricia Walden (Shambhala, 2004).

    By Nora Simmons
  • Prevent Cancer With a Dose of Sun

    At last, some good news about the sun. Basking in its rays for 10 to 15 minutes each day increases levels of vitamin D in the blood enough to reduce your risk of breast, colon, prostate, and lung cancers, according to a recent study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    By Gina Roberts-Grey